Abstract

Wes earned a B.F.A. in photography at Utah State University and worked as a commercial/industrial photographer for a more than a decade in the photogenic state of Utah. He received a master's degree in instructional design and technology and was an IT director/manager for over 23 years. While working in IT he kept his photography alive both professionally and personally. He currently enjoys teaching art at South Central College, Mankato, MN. His photography has been published worldwide. Wes' most memorable photography moment was in 1984 when he received the best in show/purchase award from Ruth Bernhard at the Annual Utah State University Photography Exhibition. You can find more of Wes' current and earlier work at westaylorphotography.com or flickr.com/westaylor. Artist's Statement: I am a bit distracted by the world around me. Ask any of my family and friends. I find everything and everyone to be of interest in some unique way and it shows up in my work. I use the camera to enter an unexplored world, a place of curious self-expression, but also a world of new relationships, new chances, new beginnings and most importantly new stories. The camera is my personal icebreaker that gives me a chance to explore places and situations that I would otherwise not be able to explore. I make photographs purposefully for myself, to identify with known and hidden qualities of my character, to better understand my reality, and to express my interpretation of the environment and people around me. In the end it allows me to explore fragments of life in different times and in different places. What You Are About to See: In this exhibit you will see a few photographs combined together in triptychs that speak to personal relationships. Other images might appear simple and direct at first inspection. Please take a second look! Some pieces were taken from a vehicle doing 60 mph with the camera set at 1/15th of second creating slices of time and place that have a certain twist about them. These motion pieces are using a physical phenomenon called "Motion Parallax". No Photoshop filters were used. What you see was caught in camera at the time of exposure.

Advisor

David Morano

First Committee Member

Todd Shanafelt

Second Committee Member

James Wilde

Date of Degree

2014

Language

english

Document Type

Thesis

Degree

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Art

College

Arts and Humanities

MAShowCard.pdf (563 kB)
Exhibition Showcard

ArtistsStatementandBioFinal.pdf (41 kB)
Artist's Statement

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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