Abstract

The purpose of this study was to identify and compare definitions of, and perceptions about, domestic violence of international students enrolled in spring semester, 2012 at Minnesota State University, Mankato. These definitions and perceptions were compared according to the presence of domestic violence policies in the international students’ countries of origin as well as their gender and the length of residence in the United States. A quantitative cross-sectional online survey was conducted to collect data regarding participants’ definitions of different types of domestic violence, appropriateness of hitting and yelling in the relationship, and their perceptions about domestic violence. International students from the following countries participated in this study: Nepal, Bangladesh, India, South Korea, Japan, Moldova, Saudi Arabia, and Pakistan. The survey included four-point Likert type (strongly disagree, disagree, agree, strongly agree) items and dichotomous (yes or no) questions. Analysis of variance was used to compare the students’ definitions of, and perceptions about domestic violence according to the presence of domestic violence policies in the international students’ countries of origin as well as their gender and the length of residence in the United States. Significant differences were noted between participants’ definitions of, and perceptions about, domestic violence. Significant differences were found between the participants’ definitions of domestic violence according to existence of domestic violence legislation in their countries of origin. A significant difference regarding the appropriateness of hitting in the relationship was also revealed according to the existence of domestic violence legislation in participants’ countries of origin. Significant differences related to the participants’ perceptions about domestic violence on four factors scales (healthy relationship, traditional male role, appropriateness of violence in relationships, and individuality in the relationship) were found according to the existence of domestic violence legislation in their countries of origin as well as their gender. Health educators are encouraged to advocate for domestic violence legislation and provide education interventions designed to prevent domestic violence.

Advisor

Marlene Tappe

First Committee Member

Dawn Larsen

Second Committee Member

Helen Crump

Date of Degree

2012

Language

english

Document Type

Thesis

Degree

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Health Science

College

Allied Health and Nursing

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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