Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the role of emotional intelligence, gender, fraternity/sorority membership, and residence on alcohol use among undergraduate students enrolled in spring semester, 2013 at Minnesota State University, Mankato. The relationship between emotional intelligence and alcohol use was studied. Moreover, the effect of gender, fraternity/sorority membership, and residence on alcohol use was determined. Participants were 390 students of Minnesota State University, Mankato. A quantitative cross-sectional online survey was conducted to collect data regarding students' emotional intelligence status and alcohol use through Schutte Self Report Intentory (SSRI) for emotional intelligence (Schutte, Malouff, Hall, Haggerty, Cooper, Golden, & Dornheim, 1998), and Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) for alcohol consumption (World Health Organization [WHO], 2012). An inverse relationship was found between emotional intelligence and alcohol use. Alcohol use was more common among male students. Results from the step-wise multiple regression analysis indicated that managing own emotions, being male, and living off-campus were predictors of alcohol use. Emotional intelligence didn't vary between different genders, and fraternity/sorority membership had no effect on emotional intelligence or alcohol use.

Advisor

Margaret Murray-Davis

First Committee Member

Roy Kammer

Second Committee Member

John Seymour

Date of Degree

2013

Language

english

Document Type

Thesis

Degree

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Health Science

College

Allied Health and Nursing

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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