Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess whether there is a relationship between the self-reported level of religiosity and the self-reported level of depression among sampled Kenyans in the Twin Cities Metro Area, in Minnesota. The sample consisted of 63 individuals who were members or visitors at Destiny Faith Ministries and United Seventh-Day Adventist Church.

Results showed that 98.4% (n=60) of participants identified themselves with a specific religion, 90.4% (n=57) scored 40 and above on the religiosity scale, which indicated strong religiosity. Majority of participants (66.8%, n=42) indicated that they had been bothered for several days by at least one symptom of depression on the PHQ-9. No significant correlation was found between the self-reported level of religiosity and the self-reported level of depression among sampled Kenyans (r=-.192, n=63, p>.05).

These results added to the existing research that remains controversial and debatable on the relationship between religiosity and depression. Based on this the researcher recommended that more research is done on this topic, with a focus on immigrant populations, especially small underrepresented immigrant populations.

Advisor

Dawn Larsen

First Committee Member

Amy Hedman-Robertson

Second Committee Member

Autumn Hamilton

Date of Degree

2017

Language

english

Document Type

Thesis

Degree

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Health Science

College

Allied Health and Nursing

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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