Abstract

Poor oral health knowledge and poor oral health practices have been a silent epidemic in the United States of America. This self-perpetuating cycle of poor oral health knowledge and poor oral health practices have affected groups of people in the United States with low income who are at risk of population due to the lack of insurance. Scholars have shown that poor oral health can result from a lack of access to preventive care (dental appointments) and restorable care when dental diseases or issues may be fixed. Poor oral health knowledge may lead to poor oral health self-care practices down the road. This study investigates oral health knowledge, oral health practices and susceptibility to oral health diseases at a Midwestern university among health 101 students. A sample of 214 students from health 101 classes were taken to participate in the survey. The Results displayed students had a moderate score when it came to oral health knowledge but could show improvements on their oral health practices. Males felt like they were more susceptible to oral health diseases rather than females.

Advisor

Mark Windschitl

First Committee Member

Amy Hedman

Second Committee Member

Lynette Engeswick

Date of Degree

2017

Language

english

Document Type

Thesis

Degree

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Health Science

College

Allied Health and Nursing

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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