Abstract

In the wake of corporate scandals such as Enron and WorldCom, organizational transparency has received increasing attention in the media and socio-political discourse. Widespread commercial fraud has shaken the trust of employees and consumers alike. Transparency, or the lack thereof, is often cited as the underlying cause of this debacle (Edelman, 2007). The term transparency has now become commonplace across a broad range of disciplines (e.g. public relations, accounting, leadership, political science, and economics). While this cross-discipline interest serves to highlight the relevance of the construct, it hinders a consensual definition.

Advisor

Daniel Sachau

First Committee Member

Kathleen Dale

Second Committee Member

Kristie Campana

Date of Degree

2017

Language

english

Document Type

Thesis

Degree

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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