Event Title

Psychological Distress: Transitioning Patients from Survivorship to the New Normal

Streaming Media

Document Type

Event

Description

The continuity of care support for patients and their families during cancer recovery is a population health issue. The focus on expanding services to assist the patient and families through the emotions with the residual effects of recovery would allow healthcare providers to interact with patients and families, as the unit of care, on a more intimate and meaningful level. Empathy by providers towards the psychological and physical aspects of recovery is emotionally primal. The information provided to patients and families during recovery requires psychosocial health literacy that fits the needs of the entire family unit. The patient and family unit must cope with: a) psychosocial distress related to an unknown future in recovery, and b) psychosocial distress related to family functioning in the new normal of care. There is a need for the family unit to receive psychosocial support from healthcare teams and communities with vested interest in the family unit. The ability of the patient and family unit to talk with others regarding their concerns during recovery may alleviate some distress and amplify the empathy and support for the patient and family by the provider.

Keywords

patient-centered, caring, translational, innovative process

Degree

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)

Department

School of Nursing

College

Allied Health and Nursing

First Faculty Advisor's Name

Sue Bell

First Faculty Advisor's Department

School of Nursing

First Faculty Advisor's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Second Faculty Advisor's Name

Sandra Eggenberger

Second Faculty Advisor's Department

School of Nursing

Second Faculty Advisor's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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Apr 17th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Psychological Distress: Transitioning Patients from Survivorship to the New Normal

The continuity of care support for patients and their families during cancer recovery is a population health issue. The focus on expanding services to assist the patient and families through the emotions with the residual effects of recovery would allow healthcare providers to interact with patients and families, as the unit of care, on a more intimate and meaningful level. Empathy by providers towards the psychological and physical aspects of recovery is emotionally primal. The information provided to patients and families during recovery requires psychosocial health literacy that fits the needs of the entire family unit. The patient and family unit must cope with: a) psychosocial distress related to an unknown future in recovery, and b) psychosocial distress related to family functioning in the new normal of care. There is a need for the family unit to receive psychosocial support from healthcare teams and communities with vested interest in the family unit. The ability of the patient and family unit to talk with others regarding their concerns during recovery may alleviate some distress and amplify the empathy and support for the patient and family by the provider.