Event Title

A Modified Cover, Copy and Compare Math Fact Fluency Intervention

Streaming Media

Document Type

Event

Description

The use of iPads as a classroom learning tool is becoming more popular, however, their effectiveness to be used as interventions is still unknown. The authors conducted a study investigating the effectiveness of an iPad-modified cover, copy and compare (CCC) intervention. The CCC intervention is a test-study method were students memorize the math fact, cover the math fact, copy the math fact from memory then compare their answer to the one that they memorized. The authors looked at the modified intervention effect on math fact fluency by comparing student growth of a paper CCC intervention and the modified iPad CCC intervention. They also looked at students’ preferences for both interventions using the Kid Intervention Profile (KIP). They conducted the study in a 4th grad classroom in Minnesota, randomly splitting the class into two groups. One group received the modified iPad CCC intervention while the other group received the paper CCC intervention. After four weeks, they took the mid-test and KIP and switched interventions. This study lasted for a total of 8 weeks. Students’ progress was monitored using AIMSweb pre- mid- and post-test to access the growth of multiplication fact fluency. Results of this study showed that growth rates of math fact fluency did not significantly differ the interventions. This means that the modified iPad CCC intervention could be just as effective as the original CCC intervention. This provides some evidence that the iPad can be an effective multiplication math fact fluency intervention.

Keywords

math, intervention, iPad

Degree

Doctor of Psychology (PsyD)

Department

Psychology

College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

First Faculty Advisor's Name

Carlos Panahon

First Faculty Advisor's Department

Psychology

First Faculty Advisor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Second Faculty Advisor's Name

Shawna Petersen-Brown

Second Faculty Advisor's Department

Psychology

Second Faculty Advisor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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Apr 17th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

A Modified Cover, Copy and Compare Math Fact Fluency Intervention

The use of iPads as a classroom learning tool is becoming more popular, however, their effectiveness to be used as interventions is still unknown. The authors conducted a study investigating the effectiveness of an iPad-modified cover, copy and compare (CCC) intervention. The CCC intervention is a test-study method were students memorize the math fact, cover the math fact, copy the math fact from memory then compare their answer to the one that they memorized. The authors looked at the modified intervention effect on math fact fluency by comparing student growth of a paper CCC intervention and the modified iPad CCC intervention. They also looked at students’ preferences for both interventions using the Kid Intervention Profile (KIP). They conducted the study in a 4th grad classroom in Minnesota, randomly splitting the class into two groups. One group received the modified iPad CCC intervention while the other group received the paper CCC intervention. After four weeks, they took the mid-test and KIP and switched interventions. This study lasted for a total of 8 weeks. Students’ progress was monitored using AIMSweb pre- mid- and post-test to access the growth of multiplication fact fluency. Results of this study showed that growth rates of math fact fluency did not significantly differ the interventions. This means that the modified iPad CCC intervention could be just as effective as the original CCC intervention. This provides some evidence that the iPad can be an effective multiplication math fact fluency intervention.