Event Title

Writing Probes Assessed Using Four Curriculum-Based Scoring Procedures

Streaming Media

Document Type

Event

Description

Teachers and practitioners are always looking for efficient ways to gauge student writing performance for progress monitoring. AimsWeb, a progress monitoring curriculum-based measurement system developed by the University of Minnesota, includes total words written (TWW), correct word sequences (CWS), incorrect word sequences (IWS), and correct minus incorrect word sequences (CIWS; Videen, Deno, & Marston, 1991). TWW was identified as a way to quantify writing production; CWS, IWS, and CIWS are measures of writing quality. This archival study was a continuation of the choice intervention study presented at the National Association of School Psychologists Conference (Steinman & Schreiber, 2016). The data collected from 2nd and 6th grade students from Midwestern schools were analyzed to identify correlations between TWW, CWS, IWS, and CIWS on writing probes, scored according to the Rules for Scoring Correct Word Sequences by the University of Minnesota Research Institute on Progress Monitoring (2005). This study hypothesized that there would be a correlation between two or more of the measures; then further that TWW would be the most efficient in measuring writing performance. Pearson’s correlation was computed between each pair of the scoring methods and found that strong, significant correlations were found between TWW and CWS and CIWS (r= .929 and r=.760, respectively). These results suggest that scoring writing with TWW is an efficient way to obtain progress monitoring data.

Keywords

writing, CBM, curriculum-based measures, efficiency, scoring

Degree

Doctor of Psychology (PsyD)

Department

Psychology

College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

First Faculty Advisor's Name

Carlos Panahon

First Faculty Advisor's Department

Psychology

First Faculty Advisor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Second Faculty Advisor's Name

Shawna Petersen-Brown

Second Faculty Advisor's Department

Psychology

Second Faculty Advisor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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Apr 17th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Writing Probes Assessed Using Four Curriculum-Based Scoring Procedures

Teachers and practitioners are always looking for efficient ways to gauge student writing performance for progress monitoring. AimsWeb, a progress monitoring curriculum-based measurement system developed by the University of Minnesota, includes total words written (TWW), correct word sequences (CWS), incorrect word sequences (IWS), and correct minus incorrect word sequences (CIWS; Videen, Deno, & Marston, 1991). TWW was identified as a way to quantify writing production; CWS, IWS, and CIWS are measures of writing quality. This archival study was a continuation of the choice intervention study presented at the National Association of School Psychologists Conference (Steinman & Schreiber, 2016). The data collected from 2nd and 6th grade students from Midwestern schools were analyzed to identify correlations between TWW, CWS, IWS, and CIWS on writing probes, scored according to the Rules for Scoring Correct Word Sequences by the University of Minnesota Research Institute on Progress Monitoring (2005). This study hypothesized that there would be a correlation between two or more of the measures; then further that TWW would be the most efficient in measuring writing performance. Pearson’s correlation was computed between each pair of the scoring methods and found that strong, significant correlations were found between TWW and CWS and CIWS (r= .929 and r=.760, respectively). These results suggest that scoring writing with TWW is an efficient way to obtain progress monitoring data.