Event Title

Evaluating the Educational Potential of iPad Math Applications

Streaming Media

Document Type

Event

Description

A survey sent out to preschool through 12th grade teachers working in the Midwest found that app selection is the second highest barrier to integrating iPads into the classroom. This survey also sought teachers' input as to the top three apps used in their classroom fro the areas of reading, writing, math, leisure/free time, and social/emotional support. Research on effective curriculum activity components was paired with the recommended apps to formulate a rubric to determine an app's educational potential.

The rubric formulated for app evaluation included 5 domains: the type of skill practice offered, the number of adjustable levels, the type of level advancement, the feedback that was provided, and the type of data collection possible. A four-point Likert scale was used to determine the quality of each domain with 0 representing poor quality and 3 representing high quality. Information regarding what makes a classroom activity beneficial, how it pertains to iPad apps, and the rankings of the top recommended apps will be presented.

Keywords

technology, education, math

Degree

Doctor of Psychology (PsyD)

Department

Psychology

College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

First Faculty Advisor's Name

Carlos Panahon

First Faculty Advisor's Department

Psychology

First Faculty Advisor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Second Faculty Advisor's Name

Shawna Petersen-Brown

Second Faculty Advisor's Department

Psychology

Second Faculty Advisor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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Apr 17th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Evaluating the Educational Potential of iPad Math Applications

A survey sent out to preschool through 12th grade teachers working in the Midwest found that app selection is the second highest barrier to integrating iPads into the classroom. This survey also sought teachers' input as to the top three apps used in their classroom fro the areas of reading, writing, math, leisure/free time, and social/emotional support. Research on effective curriculum activity components was paired with the recommended apps to formulate a rubric to determine an app's educational potential.

The rubric formulated for app evaluation included 5 domains: the type of skill practice offered, the number of adjustable levels, the type of level advancement, the feedback that was provided, and the type of data collection possible. A four-point Likert scale was used to determine the quality of each domain with 0 representing poor quality and 3 representing high quality. Information regarding what makes a classroom activity beneficial, how it pertains to iPad apps, and the rankings of the top recommended apps will be presented.