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1st Student's Major

Chemistry and Geology, Biological Sciences

1st Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Students' Professional Biography

Charalette spent her childhood days on a farm in Arlington Minnesota. She moved to LeSueur at the age of twelve. After graduating from LeSueur Henderson High School she was employed at Belle Pharmaceuticals Inc. in Belle Plaine, Minnesota. She worked there from June 1995 to September 2005. Duties that she preformed were that of Quality Control, Laboratory Analyst, and Document Control. In June 2005 she took a job at Shopko Pharmacy in Mankato, Minnesota working as a pharmacy technician. She decided that pharmacy was the career she wanted to pursue. Charalette enrolled at Minnesota State University, Mankato in the fall of 2004 and is currently a Pre-Pharmacy student. She is working on achieving her Bachelor of Science in chemistry and a minor in biology. In January of 2006 she started her research at Minnesota State University, Mankato in the Biology Department under the mentor of Dr. Michael Bentley. She started out working on vascular techniques and other laboratory skills along with her partner Ken Willaert. Charalette is also a member of the Pre-Pharmacy Club since September of 2005 and is currently the treasurer of the club. She has received an Alliss scholarship and has been on the dean’s list at MSU. Her goals for the future are to be accepted into a pharmacy program and to continue conducting research. Ken Willaert was born in Mankato, MN on January 28, 1985. He was born to Robert and Jeanne Willaert as the third oldest in a family of seven children. For the first few years of his life, Ken grew up in St. Peter, MN, just north of Mankato, where his family owned and operated a farm. His family soon moved to Mankato after struggling through financial hardship. Ken received most of his education while in Mankato. Upon graduation from Mankato East High School, Ken was accepted to and graduated from Minnesota State University, Mankato. He graduated May 2007, Summa Cum Laude, with a Bachelor of Science in biology and a minor in chemistry. Originating in high school and extending into his college years, Ken participated in a number of activities and organizations. Ken extended his passion for swimming, founded from his younger years, to his first three years at MSU. Ken has also been involved in various student organizations at MSU such as Chemistry, Biology, and Pre-Med. Clubs. Ken served as a student representative for his college in the Student Government, in the Dean Search Committee, and in the Student Advisory Board. During his last few years at MSU, Ken was involved in undergraduate research mentored by Dr. Michael Bentley. He and his partners looked at the vascular architecture within various organs of murine animals. With his education, Ken plans to pursue a career in the medical field. He wishes to one day settle down in Mankato, where he looks forward to raising a family and involving himself in such a wonderful community.

Mentor's Name

Michael Bentley

Mentor's Email Address

michael.bentley@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Abstract

The liver is a highly complex vascular organ containing an intricate network of arteries, arterioles, portal veins, veins, venules, and capillaries. This complex network could change in situations related to vascular disease such as hypertension. We examined the vasculature in rat livers by scanning electron microscopy. The tissue was prepared by perfusing either Mercox resin or polyurethane resin into the vasculature. Once the resin polymerized, each liver was placed in concentrated potassium hydroxide to corrode the tissue from the vascular casts. The casts were critical point dried, sputter coated with gold-palladium, and viewed by scanning electron microscopy. Examination of the vascular architecture showed the circulatory patterns in the various lobes of the liver. The capillaries from the arterial and portal venous supply were continuous with the venous drainage. The information gathered in this study may aid ongoing research in hypertension studies and future studies involving liver regeneration.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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