Title

College Students' Preferences for Test Accommodations

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

6-2014

Department

Psychology

Abstract

College students with (n = 137) and without disabilities (n = 475) were surveyed about their perceptions of using various types of test accommodations. Results indicated that extended time was perceived as having a positive effect by the most students (>87% of both groups), followed by separate room testing and extra breaks (>60% of both groups). Students with disabilities rated separate room, a scribe, reader, and word processor more positively than did nondisabled students. Students generally felt that test accommodations on high-stakes exams would be more beneficial than on classroom tests. A significant number of students felt that everyone should have access to test accommodations, and/or that tests should be redesigned to remove the need for accommodations. Implications of these findings for practice and future research are discussed.

Publication Title

Canadian Journal of School Psychology

DOI

10.1177/0829573514522116