Event Title

Examining the Relationships between Self-esteem Variables and Mental Health in Young Girls

Location

CSU 201

Start Date

6-4-2010 10:00 AM

End Date

6-4-2010 12:00 PM

Student's Major

Psychology

Student's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mentor's Name

Sarah Sifers

Mentor's Department

Psychology

Mentor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Description

Mental health problems can make it difficult to succeed and function in daily life. In order to prevent serious issues from arising, factors that influence mental health must be identified. This study examined how mental health is impacted by self-esteem variables, specifically self-perceived social acceptance, physical appearance, and behavioral conduct, in approximately 40 girls, third through fifth grade. Past studies have compared each of these self-esteem variables to aspects of mental health and found connections between them in different populations. This study determined if these conclusions are true in prepubescent girls, an age group often neglected in research. To complete this study, participants were tested at two time periods (Time 1 and Time 2), separated by a span of twelve weeks. They completed self-esteem and mental health measures at both sessions. Preliminary results revealed that social acceptance and behavioral conduct at Time 1 predicted mental health at Time 2 after controlling for mental health at Time 1. With perceived social acceptance and behavioral conduct being linked to mental health, parents and teachers may address problems at an early stage. By monitoring children’s self-esteem in these and other areas, preventive measures may be taken to ensure that children are successful at home and in school.

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Apr 6th, 10:00 AM Apr 6th, 12:00 PM

Examining the Relationships between Self-esteem Variables and Mental Health in Young Girls

CSU 201

Mental health problems can make it difficult to succeed and function in daily life. In order to prevent serious issues from arising, factors that influence mental health must be identified. This study examined how mental health is impacted by self-esteem variables, specifically self-perceived social acceptance, physical appearance, and behavioral conduct, in approximately 40 girls, third through fifth grade. Past studies have compared each of these self-esteem variables to aspects of mental health and found connections between them in different populations. This study determined if these conclusions are true in prepubescent girls, an age group often neglected in research. To complete this study, participants were tested at two time periods (Time 1 and Time 2), separated by a span of twelve weeks. They completed self-esteem and mental health measures at both sessions. Preliminary results revealed that social acceptance and behavioral conduct at Time 1 predicted mental health at Time 2 after controlling for mental health at Time 1. With perceived social acceptance and behavioral conduct being linked to mental health, parents and teachers may address problems at an early stage. By monitoring children’s self-esteem in these and other areas, preventive measures may be taken to ensure that children are successful at home and in school.

Recommended Citation

Kruger, Rachel. "Examining the Relationships between Self-esteem Variables and Mental Health in Young Girls." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 6, 2010.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2010/oral-session-09/6