Event Title

Effect of Temperature on Polyglutamine Tract Rate in Bacteria

Location

CSU 253/4/5

Start Date

5-4-2010 10:00 AM

End Date

5-4-2010 12:00 PM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Geoffrey M. Goellner

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Huntington’s disease (HD) is a severe genetic disorder with progressive neurodegenerative symptoms, ranging from emotional disturbance to uncontrolled movements and mental deterioration. Symptoms typically manifest in mid-life, and life expectancy is between 10 and 25 years after disease onset.

Interestingly, elongation of a contiguous tract of glutamines (glutamine; amino acid) in the Huntingtin protein, is the causative mutation underlying HD. In the ―normal‖ human population, the HD glutamine tract length typically ranges from 6-36 amino acids in length (ie. It is polymorphic). In individuals afflicted with HD, DNA mutation causes the number of huntingtin polyglutamines to reach well beyond the normal range, and HD manifests. If the polyglutamine tract is >60, severe symptoms appear in young ages, and it is called juvenile HD. Currently, little is known regarding the conditions that favor or inhibit mutation rate of the HD gene. This research project investigated whether temperature has any effect on polyglutamine mutation rate in Escherichia coli (DH5α). E. coli with three different lengths of HD polyglutamine (Q33, Q45, and Q56) were grown at different temperatures, 33˚C, 35˚C, 37˚C, and 39˚C, and the lengths of the polyglutamine were compared with controls.

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Apr 5th, 10:00 AM Apr 5th, 12:00 PM

Effect of Temperature on Polyglutamine Tract Rate in Bacteria

CSU 253/4/5

Huntington’s disease (HD) is a severe genetic disorder with progressive neurodegenerative symptoms, ranging from emotional disturbance to uncontrolled movements and mental deterioration. Symptoms typically manifest in mid-life, and life expectancy is between 10 and 25 years after disease onset.

Interestingly, elongation of a contiguous tract of glutamines (glutamine; amino acid) in the Huntingtin protein, is the causative mutation underlying HD. In the ―normal‖ human population, the HD glutamine tract length typically ranges from 6-36 amino acids in length (ie. It is polymorphic). In individuals afflicted with HD, DNA mutation causes the number of huntingtin polyglutamines to reach well beyond the normal range, and HD manifests. If the polyglutamine tract is >60, severe symptoms appear in young ages, and it is called juvenile HD. Currently, little is known regarding the conditions that favor or inhibit mutation rate of the HD gene. This research project investigated whether temperature has any effect on polyglutamine mutation rate in Escherichia coli (DH5α). E. coli with three different lengths of HD polyglutamine (Q33, Q45, and Q56) were grown at different temperatures, 33˚C, 35˚C, 37˚C, and 39˚C, and the lengths of the polyglutamine were compared with controls.

Recommended Citation

Lee, Han. "Effect of Temperature on Polyglutamine Tract Rate in Bacteria." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 5, 2010.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2010/poster-session-A/1