Event Title

The Effect of Renal Perfusion Pressure on the Baroreflex Response to High Blood Pressure

Location

CSU 253/4/5

Start Date

6-4-2010 10:00 AM

End Date

6-4-2010 12:00 PM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Penny Knoblich

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, affects 28.6% of the United States population. Blood pressure is controlled in the short term by a baroreflex response and in the long term by the kidneys via blood volume. The baroreflex mechanism changes heart rate and vascular resistance to correct blood pressure. It is unclear if the blood pressure at the kidneys can influence the baroreflex response. The current study investigated the effects of blood pressure at the kidneys on the baroreflex response. Female SHR and WKY rats were anesthetized and body temperature was maintained at 37˚C. A breathing tube was placed in the trachea and catheters were placed in the brachial and femoral arteries to monitor blood pressure above and at the kidneys, respectively. The jugular vein was catheterized for the infusion of saline and phenylephrine, a vasoconstriction drug. An adjustable noose was placed around the aorta above the renal arteries, to control pressure at the level of the kidneys. Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded continually using Biopac hardware and a computer. After an equilibration period, an unregulated response was recorded by giving phenylephrine to produce an increase in blood pressure for 3 minutes. The rat was allowed to recover and the phenylephrine dose was repeated, but the aortic noose was tightened to prevent a rise in blood pressure at the kidneys. The changes in heart rate in response to the rise in blood pressure were compared between the infusion with unregulated kidney pressure and the infusion with controlled kidney pressure.

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Apr 6th, 10:00 AM Apr 6th, 12:00 PM

The Effect of Renal Perfusion Pressure on the Baroreflex Response to High Blood Pressure

CSU 253/4/5

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, affects 28.6% of the United States population. Blood pressure is controlled in the short term by a baroreflex response and in the long term by the kidneys via blood volume. The baroreflex mechanism changes heart rate and vascular resistance to correct blood pressure. It is unclear if the blood pressure at the kidneys can influence the baroreflex response. The current study investigated the effects of blood pressure at the kidneys on the baroreflex response. Female SHR and WKY rats were anesthetized and body temperature was maintained at 37˚C. A breathing tube was placed in the trachea and catheters were placed in the brachial and femoral arteries to monitor blood pressure above and at the kidneys, respectively. The jugular vein was catheterized for the infusion of saline and phenylephrine, a vasoconstriction drug. An adjustable noose was placed around the aorta above the renal arteries, to control pressure at the level of the kidneys. Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded continually using Biopac hardware and a computer. After an equilibration period, an unregulated response was recorded by giving phenylephrine to produce an increase in blood pressure for 3 minutes. The rat was allowed to recover and the phenylephrine dose was repeated, but the aortic noose was tightened to prevent a rise in blood pressure at the kidneys. The changes in heart rate in response to the rise in blood pressure were compared between the infusion with unregulated kidney pressure and the infusion with controlled kidney pressure.

Recommended Citation

Hanson, Dwight and Meredith Lovaas. "The Effect of Renal Perfusion Pressure on the Baroreflex Response to High Blood Pressure." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 6, 2010.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2010/poster-session-A/2