Event Title

Violence Exposure, Self-Esteem and Alcohol Consumption in Adolescents

Location

CSU 201

Start Date

4-4-2011 11:00 AM

End Date

4-4-2011 12:30 PM

Student's Major

Psychology

Student's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mentor's Name

Sarah Sifers

Mentor's Department

Psychology

Mentor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Description

This study examined exposure to violence, self-esteem and alcohol consumption in young adolescents. Two hundred sixth and ninth graders in the public schools of a Midwestern small metropolitan area completed the Search Institute Profiles of Student Life: Attitudes and Behaviors in their first period class. Being a victim/witnesses of violence was associated with more alcohol consumption. Self-esteem did not predict alcohol use nor did it interact with violence exposure in predicting alcohol use. Students participating in violence reported more alcohol use. Self-esteem interacted with participating in violence such that higher self-esteem increased the likelihood of alcohol use among youth participating in violence. It is logical both being a victim/witness of violence and participating in violence are risk factors for alcohol use. However, it appears that high self-esteem does not protect against alcohol consumption among youth who are victims/witness of violence, and in fact is a risk factor in adolescents who participate in violence. This suggests that intervening to reduce exposure to violence (as a victim/witness and perpetrator) may be helpful in reducing risk of alcohol use in young adolescents.

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Apr 4th, 11:00 AM Apr 4th, 12:30 PM

Violence Exposure, Self-Esteem and Alcohol Consumption in Adolescents

CSU 201

This study examined exposure to violence, self-esteem and alcohol consumption in young adolescents. Two hundred sixth and ninth graders in the public schools of a Midwestern small metropolitan area completed the Search Institute Profiles of Student Life: Attitudes and Behaviors in their first period class. Being a victim/witnesses of violence was associated with more alcohol consumption. Self-esteem did not predict alcohol use nor did it interact with violence exposure in predicting alcohol use. Students participating in violence reported more alcohol use. Self-esteem interacted with participating in violence such that higher self-esteem increased the likelihood of alcohol use among youth participating in violence. It is logical both being a victim/witness of violence and participating in violence are risk factors for alcohol use. However, it appears that high self-esteem does not protect against alcohol consumption among youth who are victims/witness of violence, and in fact is a risk factor in adolescents who participate in violence. This suggests that intervening to reduce exposure to violence (as a victim/witness and perpetrator) may be helpful in reducing risk of alcohol use in young adolescents.

Recommended Citation

Neubert, Leah. "Violence Exposure, Self-Esteem and Alcohol Consumption in Adolescents." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 4, 2011.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2011/oral-session-04/3