Event Title

The Effects of Similarity, Accuracy & Adaptability of Shared Mental Models on Performance

Location

CSU 201

Start Date

4-4-2011 11:00 AM

End Date

4-4-2011 12:30 PM

Student's Major

Psychology

Student's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mentor's Name

Andi Lassiter

Mentor's Department

Psychology

Mentor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Description

In a team environment, shared mental models are crucial to team processes and outcomes (Cannon-Bowers, 1993; Mathieu, 2000). Shared mental models (SMM) are knowledge structures that facilitate team coordination. Although there four types of SMM, as outlined by Cannon-Bowers, I will be focusing on team-interaction and team knowledge SMM. The purpose of this study was to examine multiple measures of SMM and comparing different methods of measurement predicting team performance and effectiveness using existing, archival data. By focusing on concept maps that display team coordination, SMM were able to be scored and compared across teams. Performance was scored based on their ability to complete objectives in a computer war simulation game, Command & Conquer: Red Alert. I hope to find that teams

who have more shared, more accurate, and those who have more shared-accurate mental models will perform higher. Also, I hypothesize that teams who improve mental model scores from time one to time two will perform higher. Finally, I anticipate that team-inteaction mental models will predict team knowledge mental models (especially over time). Measures of shared cognition were collected in the previous research study, but this data has not been previously analyzed. SMM data was coded objective measures of sharedness, accuracy, and shared accuracy. After developing a coding scheme and training raters, three independent raters coded the content of various mental model measures. Interrater reliability statistics were used to ensure the ratings are consistent across evaluators. The results will determine if similar, accurate and adaptable SMM improve performance.

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Apr 4th, 11:00 AM Apr 4th, 12:30 PM

The Effects of Similarity, Accuracy & Adaptability of Shared Mental Models on Performance

CSU 201

In a team environment, shared mental models are crucial to team processes and outcomes (Cannon-Bowers, 1993; Mathieu, 2000). Shared mental models (SMM) are knowledge structures that facilitate team coordination. Although there four types of SMM, as outlined by Cannon-Bowers, I will be focusing on team-interaction and team knowledge SMM. The purpose of this study was to examine multiple measures of SMM and comparing different methods of measurement predicting team performance and effectiveness using existing, archival data. By focusing on concept maps that display team coordination, SMM were able to be scored and compared across teams. Performance was scored based on their ability to complete objectives in a computer war simulation game, Command & Conquer: Red Alert. I hope to find that teams

who have more shared, more accurate, and those who have more shared-accurate mental models will perform higher. Also, I hypothesize that teams who improve mental model scores from time one to time two will perform higher. Finally, I anticipate that team-inteaction mental models will predict team knowledge mental models (especially over time). Measures of shared cognition were collected in the previous research study, but this data has not been previously analyzed. SMM data was coded objective measures of sharedness, accuracy, and shared accuracy. After developing a coding scheme and training raters, three independent raters coded the content of various mental model measures. Interrater reliability statistics were used to ensure the ratings are consistent across evaluators. The results will determine if similar, accurate and adaptable SMM improve performance.

Recommended Citation

Schumann, Matt. "The Effects of Similarity, Accuracy & Adaptability of Shared Mental Models on Performance." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 4, 2011.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2011/oral-session-04/4