Event Title

Classification of Childhood Cancer Subtypes from Microarray Data

Location

CSU 204

Start Date

4-4-2011 11:00 AM

End Date

4-4-2011 12:30 PM

Student's Major

Mathematics and Statistics

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Namyong Lee

Mentor's Department

Mathematics and Statistics

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Neruroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and the Ewing family of tumors are four subtypes of childhood cancers. Each year more than 65,000 children are affected by these cancerous tumors. Symptoms may vary and are often fatal. Therefore, it is essential that these cancers are correctly diagnosed and classified because of different treatment options. However, these four cancers are often difficult to distinguish between and accurately identify by normal methods of diagnosis. A microarray analysis distinguishes between the cancers by determining which set of genes are active in an organism. The purpose of this research was to explore a statistical method called SCOOP (Shrunken Centroid Ordering by Orthogonal Projections) to see if it could accurately identify the type of cancer for each patient based on the information from the microarray data. Then, the method could be applied to new patients to accurately diagnose them.

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Apr 4th, 11:00 AM Apr 4th, 12:30 PM

Classification of Childhood Cancer Subtypes from Microarray Data

CSU 204

Neruroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and the Ewing family of tumors are four subtypes of childhood cancers. Each year more than 65,000 children are affected by these cancerous tumors. Symptoms may vary and are often fatal. Therefore, it is essential that these cancers are correctly diagnosed and classified because of different treatment options. However, these four cancers are often difficult to distinguish between and accurately identify by normal methods of diagnosis. A microarray analysis distinguishes between the cancers by determining which set of genes are active in an organism. The purpose of this research was to explore a statistical method called SCOOP (Shrunken Centroid Ordering by Orthogonal Projections) to see if it could accurately identify the type of cancer for each patient based on the information from the microarray data. Then, the method could be applied to new patients to accurately diagnose them.

Recommended Citation

Groskreutz, Katie. "Classification of Childhood Cancer Subtypes from Microarray Data." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 4, 2011.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2011/oral-session-05/3