Event Title

Small Engines Ethanol Research

Location

CSU 204

Start Date

4-4-2011 1:30 PM

End Date

4-4-2011 3:00 PM

Student's Major

Automotive and Manufacturing Engineering Technology

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Gary Mead

Mentor's Department

Automotive and Manufacturing Engineering Technology

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Ethanol is an alternative renewable fuel which is currently blended with gasoline in Minnesota and many other states to create a fuel with a 10% ethanol content (E10). Current Minnesota legislation states that by August 30, 2013 gasoline sold in Minnesota must contain at least 20% ethanol. Before a new fuel such as E20 can be used, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must conclude that the fuel will not negatively affect engines and their systems. Small engines are the most susceptible to increased ethanol concentration in gasoline because of their inability to electronically adapt to the changes in the fuel. They also make up a large percentage of all engines sold and are used in a variety of ways all over the world. The study consisted of running four different fuels in four different engines of the same model for their full useful life. The four fuels tested were E0 (0% ethanol), E10, E15, and E20. Through emissions testing, performance testing, and aging the effect that ethanol had on these engines was determined.

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Apr 4th, 1:30 PM Apr 4th, 3:00 PM

Small Engines Ethanol Research

CSU 204

Ethanol is an alternative renewable fuel which is currently blended with gasoline in Minnesota and many other states to create a fuel with a 10% ethanol content (E10). Current Minnesota legislation states that by August 30, 2013 gasoline sold in Minnesota must contain at least 20% ethanol. Before a new fuel such as E20 can be used, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must conclude that the fuel will not negatively affect engines and their systems. Small engines are the most susceptible to increased ethanol concentration in gasoline because of their inability to electronically adapt to the changes in the fuel. They also make up a large percentage of all engines sold and are used in a variety of ways all over the world. The study consisted of running four different fuels in four different engines of the same model for their full useful life. The four fuels tested were E0 (0% ethanol), E10, E15, and E20. Through emissions testing, performance testing, and aging the effect that ethanol had on these engines was determined.

Recommended Citation

Swensen, Kyle and Kevin Shutrop. "Small Engines Ethanol Research." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 4, 2011.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2011/oral-session-08/3