Event Title

The Cultural Acceptance of Male Contraception and its Implications in Reproductive Justice

Location

CSU 284A

Start Date

4-4-2011 1:00 PM

End Date

4-4-2011 3:00 PM

Student's Major

Gender and Women's Studies

Student's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mentor's Name

Dawn Rae Davis

Mentor's Department

Gender and Women's Studies

Mentor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Description

There are more methods of contraception available for women than men and increasing the availability of contraception for women alone increases the expectation that contraception is solely the responsibility of women and not equally shared by men. Improved access to contraception has had positive impacts on women by increasing their reproductive control. However, in order to attain reproductive justice the choice and use of contraception needs to be equally available for men and women. This project studied published research, promotion of male contraception and how it is used and perceived. The outcome of this study points to the importance of social and cultural acceptance of male contraception in order to increase males‘ use of contraception. Our analysis of the acceptance survey and published literature on male contraception demonstrated the need for an increased effort in research into methods of contraception for men besides condoms, abstinence and vasectomy and the need for the promotion of male use of reliable contraception in order to increase its acceptance.

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Apr 4th, 1:00 PM Apr 4th, 3:00 PM

The Cultural Acceptance of Male Contraception and its Implications in Reproductive Justice

CSU 284A

There are more methods of contraception available for women than men and increasing the availability of contraception for women alone increases the expectation that contraception is solely the responsibility of women and not equally shared by men. Improved access to contraception has had positive impacts on women by increasing their reproductive control. However, in order to attain reproductive justice the choice and use of contraception needs to be equally available for men and women. This project studied published research, promotion of male contraception and how it is used and perceived. The outcome of this study points to the importance of social and cultural acceptance of male contraception in order to increase males‘ use of contraception. Our analysis of the acceptance survey and published literature on male contraception demonstrated the need for an increased effort in research into methods of contraception for men besides condoms, abstinence and vasectomy and the need for the promotion of male use of reliable contraception in order to increase its acceptance.

Recommended Citation

Gilbert, Sarah and Cybill Okitikpi. "The Cultural Acceptance of Male Contraception and its Implications in Reproductive Justice." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 4, 2011.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2011/oral-session-09/2