Event Title

US Intervention in Russia 1918-1920: The Forgotten Mutiny

Location

CSU 201

Start Date

5-4-2011 9:00 AM

End Date

5-4-2011 10:30 AM

Student's Major

History

Student's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mentor's Name

Matthew Loayza

Mentor's Department

History

Mentor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Description

After Russia withdrew from WWI, the Allied nations worried about Germany relocating its eastern front forces to the western front. Britain and France both urged the United States to militarily intervene in Russia to reopen the eastern front. Although President Wilson initially ignored this proposition of the Allied nations, he reconsidered in 1918 and ordered troops to Russia. Many scholars have examined the US intervention in Russia and debated why Wilson decided to use American troops in Russia. The preoccupation among historians as to why these troops were sent to Russia has caused them to overlook why some of these troops mutinied against their commanding officers. The 1919 mutiny forced President Wilson to consider withdrawing troops from Russia, which eventually occurred in 1920. My research on the causes of the mutiny found that the underlying reasons for the mutiny were that soldiers were tired of the ambiguity of the mission in Russia, were indifferent or favorably inclined toward the Bolshevik government, and were generally weary of the war. This mutiny would change the course of American Soviet Relations for the next seventy years.

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Apr 5th, 9:00 AM Apr 5th, 10:30 AM

US Intervention in Russia 1918-1920: The Forgotten Mutiny

CSU 201

After Russia withdrew from WWI, the Allied nations worried about Germany relocating its eastern front forces to the western front. Britain and France both urged the United States to militarily intervene in Russia to reopen the eastern front. Although President Wilson initially ignored this proposition of the Allied nations, he reconsidered in 1918 and ordered troops to Russia. Many scholars have examined the US intervention in Russia and debated why Wilson decided to use American troops in Russia. The preoccupation among historians as to why these troops were sent to Russia has caused them to overlook why some of these troops mutinied against their commanding officers. The 1919 mutiny forced President Wilson to consider withdrawing troops from Russia, which eventually occurred in 1920. My research on the causes of the mutiny found that the underlying reasons for the mutiny were that soldiers were tired of the ambiguity of the mission in Russia, were indifferent or favorably inclined toward the Bolshevik government, and were generally weary of the war. This mutiny would change the course of American Soviet Relations for the next seventy years.

Recommended Citation

Lee, Austin. "US Intervention in Russia 1918-1920: The Forgotten Mutiny." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 5, 2011.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2011/oral-session-10/2