Event Title

Evaluating Teacher Perceptions of Rewards

Location

CSU 253/4/5

Start Date

4-4-2011 9:00 AM

End Date

4-4-2011 10:30 AM

Student's Major

Psychology

Student's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mentor's Name

Kevin Filter

Mentor's Department

Psychology

Mentor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Description

The aim of this research was to evaluate teacher perceptions of reward use among K-12 teachers. More specifically, we looked at whether or not teachers would use rewards to encourage appropriate behavior within the classroom setting. Though use of rewards has been supported by research, far and few are studies that report teachers‘ perceptions and attitudes for and/or against the practice. One could argue teacher perception is the most important viewpoint of all, as it is the teacher – not the researcher – who works closest with the children. To fill this research gap, we conducted a nationwide survey via e-mail using a K-12 teacher mailing list to assess not only the types of rewards used by teachers, but also their general attitudes towards reward use as well as their explanations for their attitudes. Our survey specified and separated tangible, social, escape, and privilege rewards to evaluate specific differences in use and perceptions.

Results were analyzed in relation to basic demographic information such as grade level taught and years of teaching. By looking into this largely uncharted territory and understanding teacher perceptions, we hope to help improve student outcomes by developing strategies to increase the use of positive reinforcement within the classroom.

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Apr 4th, 9:00 AM Apr 4th, 10:30 AM

Evaluating Teacher Perceptions of Rewards

CSU 253/4/5

The aim of this research was to evaluate teacher perceptions of reward use among K-12 teachers. More specifically, we looked at whether or not teachers would use rewards to encourage appropriate behavior within the classroom setting. Though use of rewards has been supported by research, far and few are studies that report teachers‘ perceptions and attitudes for and/or against the practice. One could argue teacher perception is the most important viewpoint of all, as it is the teacher – not the researcher – who works closest with the children. To fill this research gap, we conducted a nationwide survey via e-mail using a K-12 teacher mailing list to assess not only the types of rewards used by teachers, but also their general attitudes towards reward use as well as their explanations for their attitudes. Our survey specified and separated tangible, social, escape, and privilege rewards to evaluate specific differences in use and perceptions.

Results were analyzed in relation to basic demographic information such as grade level taught and years of teaching. By looking into this largely uncharted territory and understanding teacher perceptions, we hope to help improve student outcomes by developing strategies to increase the use of positive reinforcement within the classroom.

Recommended Citation

Schroeder, Jaime J. and Amy Rempher. "Evaluating Teacher Perceptions of Rewards." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 4, 2011.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2011/poster-session-A/21