Event Title

Race and Psychiatric Services in Africa

Location

CSU 253/4/5

Start Date

4-4-2011 9:00 AM

End Date

4-4-2011 10:30 AM

Student's Major

Ethnic Studies

Student's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mentor's Name

Kebba Darboe

Mentor's Department

Ethnic Studies

Mentor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Description

This project was designed to collect and share information in order to have a better understanding the connection between race and psychiatric services in Africa. This study involved in-person interviews with a psychiatrist and Somali elders between 40 and 80 years old. Elders provided personal stories and experiences of past generations.

Introduction: This project was designed to collect and to share information in order to get a better understanding of the connection between race and psychiatric services in Africa. The project gave Somali elders an opportunity to share their personal struggles of being effected with a mental health disorder or having someone close affected. Data analysis was conducted to identify themes.

Project Goals: Goals of the project included: To learn more about the health care system in Africa.To learn more about the psychiatric services available in Africa. To give Somali elders an opportunity to share their personal stories. Research

Questions: This study involved two research questions: What types of health care system is available in Africa? What are the different methods of dealing with mental health disorders in Africa?

Significance of the Project: People in Sub-Saharan Africa have the worst health, on average, in the world. The region has 11 percent of the world‘s population, 24 percent of the global disease burden, and lacks the infrastructure to provide even basic health care to its people.

Conclusion: This project was designed to collect and to share information in order to get a better understanding of the connection between race and psychiatric services in Africa. The project gave Somali elders an opportunity to share their personal struggles of being effected with a mental health disorder or having someone close affected. Future studies might indicate similar results.

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Apr 4th, 9:00 AM Apr 4th, 10:30 AM

Race and Psychiatric Services in Africa

CSU 253/4/5

This project was designed to collect and share information in order to have a better understanding the connection between race and psychiatric services in Africa. This study involved in-person interviews with a psychiatrist and Somali elders between 40 and 80 years old. Elders provided personal stories and experiences of past generations.

Introduction: This project was designed to collect and to share information in order to get a better understanding of the connection between race and psychiatric services in Africa. The project gave Somali elders an opportunity to share their personal struggles of being effected with a mental health disorder or having someone close affected. Data analysis was conducted to identify themes.

Project Goals: Goals of the project included: To learn more about the health care system in Africa.To learn more about the psychiatric services available in Africa. To give Somali elders an opportunity to share their personal stories. Research

Questions: This study involved two research questions: What types of health care system is available in Africa? What are the different methods of dealing with mental health disorders in Africa?

Significance of the Project: People in Sub-Saharan Africa have the worst health, on average, in the world. The region has 11 percent of the world‘s population, 24 percent of the global disease burden, and lacks the infrastructure to provide even basic health care to its people.

Conclusion: This project was designed to collect and to share information in order to get a better understanding of the connection between race and psychiatric services in Africa. The project gave Somali elders an opportunity to share their personal struggles of being effected with a mental health disorder or having someone close affected. Future studies might indicate similar results.

Recommended Citation

Moalim, Nasra. "Race and Psychiatric Services in Africa." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 4, 2011.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2011/poster-session-A/3