Event Title

Implications of Eating Habits, Social Class, and Lifestyle to Make Diabetes Less Prevalent in African American Culture

Location

CSU 253/4/5

Start Date

4-4-2011 11:00 AM

End Date

4-4-2011 12:30 PM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Michael Bentley

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

In this literature review I focused on the reason Type II Diabetes is more prevalent in African Americans than in any other ethnic population. I reviewed an extensive amount of material such as journals, articles, and textbooks that focused on lifestyle, eating habits, and socioeconomic status within the African American culture. The research found that African Americans consume foods that are high in fat, sugar, and sodium than many other ethnic populations. These types of foods are embedded in the culture and lifestyle, but also give African Americans a greater risk to develop Type II Diabetes. Research has shown that over half of African American woman and men are obese or overweight. These health issues are a product of little education and knowledge of the significance of healthier foods. The environment which most African Americans live in; lower to middle class neighborhoods, are saturated with affordable fast food restaurants that serve fatty foods and sugar-rich drinks. Research also shows that social class is a significant factor because the upper class can regularly buy expensive healthier foods while the lower class can afford cheap processed foods. Genetics is also a significant factor in developing Type II Diabetes. African Americans have a greater chance to develop Type II Diabetes because of certain genes that determine insulin secretion and insulin resistance. From this research I concluded that African Americans need more education and awareness of health issues in order to prevent Type II Diabetes within their lives.

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Apr 4th, 11:00 AM Apr 4th, 12:30 PM

Implications of Eating Habits, Social Class, and Lifestyle to Make Diabetes Less Prevalent in African American Culture

CSU 253/4/5

In this literature review I focused on the reason Type II Diabetes is more prevalent in African Americans than in any other ethnic population. I reviewed an extensive amount of material such as journals, articles, and textbooks that focused on lifestyle, eating habits, and socioeconomic status within the African American culture. The research found that African Americans consume foods that are high in fat, sugar, and sodium than many other ethnic populations. These types of foods are embedded in the culture and lifestyle, but also give African Americans a greater risk to develop Type II Diabetes. Research has shown that over half of African American woman and men are obese or overweight. These health issues are a product of little education and knowledge of the significance of healthier foods. The environment which most African Americans live in; lower to middle class neighborhoods, are saturated with affordable fast food restaurants that serve fatty foods and sugar-rich drinks. Research also shows that social class is a significant factor because the upper class can regularly buy expensive healthier foods while the lower class can afford cheap processed foods. Genetics is also a significant factor in developing Type II Diabetes. African Americans have a greater chance to develop Type II Diabetes because of certain genes that determine insulin secretion and insulin resistance. From this research I concluded that African Americans need more education and awareness of health issues in order to prevent Type II Diabetes within their lives.

Recommended Citation

Phipps, Julian. "Implications of Eating Habits, Social Class, and Lifestyle to Make Diabetes Less Prevalent in African American Culture." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 4, 2011.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2011/poster-session-B/7