Event Title

Investigation of the Anatomical Role of Schlemm’s Canal and Collector Channels in the Eye

Location

CSU 253/4/5

Start Date

4-4-2011 11:00 AM

End Date

4-4-2011 12:30 PM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Michael Bentley

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Glaucoma is among the most prevalent causes of blindness, resulting from increase in fluid pressure of the eye which damages the optic nerve. Schlemm‘s canal (SC) is a circular tube-like structure that encircles the iris of the eye. The canal drains aqueous humor from the anterior chamber of the eye into collector channels (CC's), which ultimately converge with the outer-most episcleral veins. SC plays a significant role in transferring several micro liters of aqueous humor per minute. In glaucoma, the fluid passage is retarded resulting in elevated intraocular pressure. In glaucoma, SC and CC have been shown to have an increased extracellular matrix material underlying the endothelial cells. Build-up of the extracellular matrix could cause narrowing of the canal and the CC orifices. The objective of this study was to understand the anatomical role of SC and CC's in the maintenance of the intraocular pressure at its normal level. Tissue samples of the SC region taken from the eyes of human cadavers, were dehydrated, critical point dried and sputter coated for scanning electron microscopy. Raised structural flaps were seen in the inner lumen of the SC and seemed to overlie the opening to the collector channels. The results suggest that the flaps may serve as valves that regulate fluid entry into the CC's. Accumulation of the extracellular matrix within these flaps could contribute to reduced fluid drainage.

Acknowledgement: The human eye tissues were obtained from Cheryl Hann MS and Dr. Michael Fautsch in the department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic.

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Apr 4th, 11:00 AM Apr 4th, 12:30 PM

Investigation of the Anatomical Role of Schlemm’s Canal and Collector Channels in the Eye

CSU 253/4/5

Glaucoma is among the most prevalent causes of blindness, resulting from increase in fluid pressure of the eye which damages the optic nerve. Schlemm‘s canal (SC) is a circular tube-like structure that encircles the iris of the eye. The canal drains aqueous humor from the anterior chamber of the eye into collector channels (CC's), which ultimately converge with the outer-most episcleral veins. SC plays a significant role in transferring several micro liters of aqueous humor per minute. In glaucoma, the fluid passage is retarded resulting in elevated intraocular pressure. In glaucoma, SC and CC have been shown to have an increased extracellular matrix material underlying the endothelial cells. Build-up of the extracellular matrix could cause narrowing of the canal and the CC orifices. The objective of this study was to understand the anatomical role of SC and CC's in the maintenance of the intraocular pressure at its normal level. Tissue samples of the SC region taken from the eyes of human cadavers, were dehydrated, critical point dried and sputter coated for scanning electron microscopy. Raised structural flaps were seen in the inner lumen of the SC and seemed to overlie the opening to the collector channels. The results suggest that the flaps may serve as valves that regulate fluid entry into the CC's. Accumulation of the extracellular matrix within these flaps could contribute to reduced fluid drainage.

Acknowledgement: The human eye tissues were obtained from Cheryl Hann MS and Dr. Michael Fautsch in the department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic.

Recommended Citation

Semahge, Betlehem A.. "Investigation of the Anatomical Role of Schlemm’s Canal and Collector Channels in the Eye." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 4, 2011.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2011/poster-session-B/9