Event Title

The Effect of Reduced Aldosterone and Voluntary Exercise on High Blood Pressure in Spontaneously Hypertensive Female Rats

Location

CSU 253/4/5

Start Date

4-4-2011 1:30 PM

End Date

4-4-2011 3:00 PM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Penny Knoblich

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

While approximately half of the population suffering from hypertension is women, few studies have investigated its contributing factors in women, and research conducted on male populations cannot be applied to females as hormone regulation varies between the two. Aldosterone, which is secreted from the outermost layer of the adrenal gland, is one of the main hormones known to influence blood pressure regulation, with an increase in aldosterone resulting in increased blood pressure. In addition, lifestyle and exercise play major roles in the development of hypertension; once established, regular exercise may be used as a means of reducing and maintaining healthy blood pressure levels. The link between aldosterone levels, exercise, and blood pressure remains unclear.

The current study aimed to investigate the relationship between surgically reduced aldosterone levels in spontaneously hypertensive female rats (SHR) and their willingness to voluntarily exercise. An adrenal freezing procedure that has previously been shown to reduce aldosterone levels to approximately 30% of normal was performed on female SHR rats at the age of six weeks; a control group of female SHR groups underwent a sham surgery. The rats were allowed to voluntarily exercise for 16-17 weeks with exercise time and distance being recorded as a weekly average. At the end of the exercise period, blood samples were collected to evaluate aldosterone and corticosterone levels to examine the relationship between these hormones involved in blood pressure regulation and willingness to exercise.

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Apr 4th, 1:30 PM Apr 4th, 3:00 PM

The Effect of Reduced Aldosterone and Voluntary Exercise on High Blood Pressure in Spontaneously Hypertensive Female Rats

CSU 253/4/5

While approximately half of the population suffering from hypertension is women, few studies have investigated its contributing factors in women, and research conducted on male populations cannot be applied to females as hormone regulation varies between the two. Aldosterone, which is secreted from the outermost layer of the adrenal gland, is one of the main hormones known to influence blood pressure regulation, with an increase in aldosterone resulting in increased blood pressure. In addition, lifestyle and exercise play major roles in the development of hypertension; once established, regular exercise may be used as a means of reducing and maintaining healthy blood pressure levels. The link between aldosterone levels, exercise, and blood pressure remains unclear.

The current study aimed to investigate the relationship between surgically reduced aldosterone levels in spontaneously hypertensive female rats (SHR) and their willingness to voluntarily exercise. An adrenal freezing procedure that has previously been shown to reduce aldosterone levels to approximately 30% of normal was performed on female SHR rats at the age of six weeks; a control group of female SHR groups underwent a sham surgery. The rats were allowed to voluntarily exercise for 16-17 weeks with exercise time and distance being recorded as a weekly average. At the end of the exercise period, blood samples were collected to evaluate aldosterone and corticosterone levels to examine the relationship between these hormones involved in blood pressure regulation and willingness to exercise.

Recommended Citation

Opakunle, Yusuf and Kristen Oldenburg. "The Effect of Reduced Aldosterone and Voluntary Exercise on High Blood Pressure in Spontaneously Hypertensive Female Rats." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 4, 2011.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2011/poster-session-C/11