Event Title

Effects of an Anticancer Agent on Brain Development of Mice on Regular and High Fat Diets

Location

CSU 253/4/5

Start Date

4-4-2011 1:30 PM

End Date

4-4-2011 3:00 PM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Steven Mercurio

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Obesity may lead to cancer as well as heart disease in young people. Mice were used to test the effect of an anticancer agent to stem the obesity caused by a high fat diet (11% fat) compared with control (4% fat) mice. This anticancer medication, Avastin®, works by preventing new blood vessel formation (antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor). The concern in developing animals and humans is that brain development may be compromised. Mice were injected i.p. for 10 days at 0.1 mg/mouse/day with Avastin® at the beginning of the 15 week feeding study to evaluate these concerns. Brain weight and brain region measurements were taken to evaluate the hypothesis that decreasing blood vessel formation would retard brain growth and development in the process of preventing new blood vessel development. Results supported this hypothesis indicating that Avastin® decreased brain weights more than it decreased weight gain in either low or high fat diet. Other brain region development also appeared affected similarly. A brain molecular marker for blood vessel development will also be brought to bear on this study. It appears that care must be taken in using this medication in children as indicated by the manufacturer to prevent the worst problems of obesity due to possible brain development deficits unless they have a life-threatening cancer.

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Apr 4th, 1:30 PM Apr 4th, 3:00 PM

Effects of an Anticancer Agent on Brain Development of Mice on Regular and High Fat Diets

CSU 253/4/5

Obesity may lead to cancer as well as heart disease in young people. Mice were used to test the effect of an anticancer agent to stem the obesity caused by a high fat diet (11% fat) compared with control (4% fat) mice. This anticancer medication, Avastin®, works by preventing new blood vessel formation (antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor). The concern in developing animals and humans is that brain development may be compromised. Mice were injected i.p. for 10 days at 0.1 mg/mouse/day with Avastin® at the beginning of the 15 week feeding study to evaluate these concerns. Brain weight and brain region measurements were taken to evaluate the hypothesis that decreasing blood vessel formation would retard brain growth and development in the process of preventing new blood vessel development. Results supported this hypothesis indicating that Avastin® decreased brain weights more than it decreased weight gain in either low or high fat diet. Other brain region development also appeared affected similarly. A brain molecular marker for blood vessel development will also be brought to bear on this study. It appears that care must be taken in using this medication in children as indicated by the manufacturer to prevent the worst problems of obesity due to possible brain development deficits unless they have a life-threatening cancer.

Recommended Citation

Sulaiman-Ifelodun, Moriamo. "Effects of an Anticancer Agent on Brain Development of Mice on Regular and High Fat Diets." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 4, 2011.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2011/poster-session-C/13