Event Title

Mathematical Modeling and Simulation of Diabetes Dynamics

Location

CSU 204

Start Date

9-4-2012 10:00 AM

End Date

9-4-2012 11:00 AM

Student's Major

Mathematics and Statistics

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Namyong Lee

Mentor's Department

Mathematics and Statistics

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Among Americans, 25.8 million are currently affected by diabetes. That is nearly 1 out of 10 Americans over the age 20 with 1.6 new million cases diagnosed every year. If the current trend continues, 1 out of every 3 adults will have diabetes by the year 2050. A few of the leading causes of diabetes consists of physical inactivity, ethnicity, family history, obesity, high blood pressure and abnormal cholesterol. A person’s lifestyle and diet incorporates most of those factors.

Understanding how people’s lifestyles and diets have changed over the past generations has always been a major area of interest, more so now with the rapid transition from natural and unprocessed food to fried and highly processed foods combined with a steep decline in activity in everyday life. In this study, we experimentally tested how different lifestyles and food affect the likelihood of developing diabetes through mathematical modeling and analysis.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 9th, 10:00 AM Apr 9th, 11:00 AM

Mathematical Modeling and Simulation of Diabetes Dynamics

CSU 204

Among Americans, 25.8 million are currently affected by diabetes. That is nearly 1 out of 10 Americans over the age 20 with 1.6 new million cases diagnosed every year. If the current trend continues, 1 out of every 3 adults will have diabetes by the year 2050. A few of the leading causes of diabetes consists of physical inactivity, ethnicity, family history, obesity, high blood pressure and abnormal cholesterol. A person’s lifestyle and diet incorporates most of those factors.

Understanding how people’s lifestyles and diets have changed over the past generations has always been a major area of interest, more so now with the rapid transition from natural and unprocessed food to fried and highly processed foods combined with a steep decline in activity in everyday life. In this study, we experimentally tested how different lifestyles and food affect the likelihood of developing diabetes through mathematical modeling and analysis.

Recommended Citation

DeBoer, Sara; Jordan Tait; Bang Huang; and Alyssa Van Klei. "Mathematical Modeling and Simulation of Diabetes Dynamics." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 9, 2012.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2012/oral-session-04/1