Event Title

The Hierarchy of Rococo Women Seen Through Fashion in Paintings

Location

CSU 201

Start Date

9-4-2012 11:00 AM

End Date

9-4-2012 12:00 PM

Student's Major

Art

Student's College

Arts and Humanities

Mentor's Name

Curt Germundson

Mentor's Department

Art

Mentor's College

Arts and Humanities

Description

The style of Rococo evokes a variety of feminine attributions; women were usually depicted in works of art in a decorative manner. Many of the interpretations of these paintings focus on the luxurious clothes and lavish backgrounds. Artists like Jean-Antoine Watteau and Francois Boucher were responsible for perpetuating a very elegant view of Rococo women within the public’s eyes. But there were also depictions of non-aristocratic women that were geared more to the middle class (bourgeois). After reading a number of articles and books on Jean-Baptiste-Simeon Chardin, and visiting the Louvre in Paris, I became aware that his works were usually of women engaged in the activities of daily life and household work. I want to argue that a detailed study of fashion within paintings can tell a lot about the different social classes and hierarchies of 18th century France. I had the opportunity to explore the differences between the social classes by also visiting the palace of Versailles, which allowed me to experience the luxurious side of the life of aristocratic women of the Rococo. As a result of my research I became aware of not just Chardin’s representations of bourgeois life, but also of other artists who were engaged in depicting a side of 18th century life different from that shown by artists such as Watteau and Boucher. The visit to the museums and the books I have read demonstrated the role played by Chardin’s work as an alternative to the luxurious Rococo style.

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Apr 9th, 11:00 AM Apr 9th, 12:00 PM

The Hierarchy of Rococo Women Seen Through Fashion in Paintings

CSU 201

The style of Rococo evokes a variety of feminine attributions; women were usually depicted in works of art in a decorative manner. Many of the interpretations of these paintings focus on the luxurious clothes and lavish backgrounds. Artists like Jean-Antoine Watteau and Francois Boucher were responsible for perpetuating a very elegant view of Rococo women within the public’s eyes. But there were also depictions of non-aristocratic women that were geared more to the middle class (bourgeois). After reading a number of articles and books on Jean-Baptiste-Simeon Chardin, and visiting the Louvre in Paris, I became aware that his works were usually of women engaged in the activities of daily life and household work. I want to argue that a detailed study of fashion within paintings can tell a lot about the different social classes and hierarchies of 18th century France. I had the opportunity to explore the differences between the social classes by also visiting the palace of Versailles, which allowed me to experience the luxurious side of the life of aristocratic women of the Rococo. As a result of my research I became aware of not just Chardin’s representations of bourgeois life, but also of other artists who were engaged in depicting a side of 18th century life different from that shown by artists such as Watteau and Boucher. The visit to the museums and the books I have read demonstrated the role played by Chardin’s work as an alternative to the luxurious Rococo style.

Recommended Citation

Brighidin, Sanda. "The Hierarchy of Rococo Women Seen Through Fashion in Paintings." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 9, 2012.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2012/oral-session-06/3