Event Title

Overnight Pediatric Oxygen Delivery System

Location

CSU 204

Start Date

9-4-2012 3:00 PM

End Date

9-4-2012 4:00 PM

Student's Major

Integrated Engineering

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Les Flemming

Mentor's Department

Integrated Engineering

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Current methods for at-home pediatric oxygen delivery are uncomfortable to children, and difficult for caretakers. The two common methods are via face mask or nasal cannula. Repetitive taping of these products may be damaging to the skin. Children also have a low tolerance for these products, requiring frequent caretaker intervention. The overnight pediatric oxygen delivery (OPOD) system is a non-invasive solution. The objective of this project is to track the position of a child’s face for selective oxygen delivery. Development of the tracking system consisted of four major steps. First, the project was scoped with the client. Second, previous and newly generated options were compared to determine the best method. Third, specifications were designed for the project. And fourth, the design was tested and improved over two improvement cycles. Throughout the semester, there was weekly communication with the client and faculty advisor for feedback and client approval. Using a sleeping pad which incorporates pressure sensors to noninvasively track the position of a child’s head is the first step to selectively deliver oxygen. To increase accuracy, a head band with reflective shapes can be worn so that an infrared camera can detect the position of a child’s head. The non-invasive methods of the OPOD system will allow children to live normally until they mature into more adult oriented treatments. Moreover, the methods developed for use in the OPOD system will be portable to adult and geriatric populations. Patient acceptability for oxygen therapy for all age levels should increase with OPOD use.

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Apr 9th, 3:00 PM Apr 9th, 4:00 PM

Overnight Pediatric Oxygen Delivery System

CSU 204

Current methods for at-home pediatric oxygen delivery are uncomfortable to children, and difficult for caretakers. The two common methods are via face mask or nasal cannula. Repetitive taping of these products may be damaging to the skin. Children also have a low tolerance for these products, requiring frequent caretaker intervention. The overnight pediatric oxygen delivery (OPOD) system is a non-invasive solution. The objective of this project is to track the position of a child’s face for selective oxygen delivery. Development of the tracking system consisted of four major steps. First, the project was scoped with the client. Second, previous and newly generated options were compared to determine the best method. Third, specifications were designed for the project. And fourth, the design was tested and improved over two improvement cycles. Throughout the semester, there was weekly communication with the client and faculty advisor for feedback and client approval. Using a sleeping pad which incorporates pressure sensors to noninvasively track the position of a child’s head is the first step to selectively deliver oxygen. To increase accuracy, a head band with reflective shapes can be worn so that an infrared camera can detect the position of a child’s head. The non-invasive methods of the OPOD system will allow children to live normally until they mature into more adult oriented treatments. Moreover, the methods developed for use in the OPOD system will be portable to adult and geriatric populations. Patient acceptability for oxygen therapy for all age levels should increase with OPOD use.

Recommended Citation

Stephenson, Brian and Eric Diep. "Overnight Pediatric Oxygen Delivery System." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 9, 2012.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2012/oral-session-13/4