Event Title

Structural Analysis of Heart and Skeletal Muscle in Genetically Altered Mice

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

9-4-2012 10:00 AM

End Date

9-4-2012 11:30 AM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Marilyn Hart

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Striated muscle, including heart and skeletal, is characterized by the precise alignment of the two prevalent muscle proteins, actin and myosin. Actin capping protein (CP) plays a significant role in the assembly of muscle fibers and contributes to maintaining the organization of the filaments. CP is a heterodimer composed of an alpha and beta subunit. In higher organisms, there are 3 isoforms of the alpha (α1, α2, α3) and 3 isoforms of the beta subunit (β1, β2, β3). The β1 is the predominate isoform of muscle tissue; β2 is the predominate isoform of non-muscle tissue. Dr. Marilyn Hart, Department of Biological Sciences, produced transgenic mice with a reduced amount of CPβ1. The hearts of the genetically altered mice had disorganized filaments and enlarged chamber walls. In this study, both skeletal and heart muscle of genetically altered and wildtype mice were compared to evaluate morphological differences. The skeletal and heart tissues of six month old mice were collected and fixed in formalin, dehydrated using a graded series of alcohol, exchanged with xylene, and imbedded with paraffin using an automated Leica Tissue Processor, TP1020. Sections (7-8 microns) were prepared using a microtone, collected on gelatin coated slides and stained with a biological differential stain, hemotoxilyn and eosin. We found that the skeletal and heart muscle were disorganized with altered periodicity and alignment of the filaments in the genetically altered mice relative to the wildtype.

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Apr 9th, 10:00 AM Apr 9th, 11:30 AM

Structural Analysis of Heart and Skeletal Muscle in Genetically Altered Mice

CSU Ballroom

Striated muscle, including heart and skeletal, is characterized by the precise alignment of the two prevalent muscle proteins, actin and myosin. Actin capping protein (CP) plays a significant role in the assembly of muscle fibers and contributes to maintaining the organization of the filaments. CP is a heterodimer composed of an alpha and beta subunit. In higher organisms, there are 3 isoforms of the alpha (α1, α2, α3) and 3 isoforms of the beta subunit (β1, β2, β3). The β1 is the predominate isoform of muscle tissue; β2 is the predominate isoform of non-muscle tissue. Dr. Marilyn Hart, Department of Biological Sciences, produced transgenic mice with a reduced amount of CPβ1. The hearts of the genetically altered mice had disorganized filaments and enlarged chamber walls. In this study, both skeletal and heart muscle of genetically altered and wildtype mice were compared to evaluate morphological differences. The skeletal and heart tissues of six month old mice were collected and fixed in formalin, dehydrated using a graded series of alcohol, exchanged with xylene, and imbedded with paraffin using an automated Leica Tissue Processor, TP1020. Sections (7-8 microns) were prepared using a microtone, collected on gelatin coated slides and stained with a biological differential stain, hemotoxilyn and eosin. We found that the skeletal and heart muscle were disorganized with altered periodicity and alignment of the filaments in the genetically altered mice relative to the wildtype.

Recommended Citation

Anderson, Kelsey and Kelli Wilson. "Structural Analysis of Heart and Skeletal Muscle in Genetically Altered Mice." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 9, 2012.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2012/poster-session-A/10