Event Title

A Possible Screening for the Development of Uterine Cancer in Obesity

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

9-4-2012 10:00 AM

End Date

9-4-2012 11:30 AM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Steven Mercurio

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Constant growth and shedding of the uterine lining in women has made them prone to mutations and cancer, especially in obesity. Obese women and animals have also shown increased sensitivity of estrogen receptors. To test the hypothesis that obese female mice challenged with estrogen would have increased cancer gene expression and reduced risk in the presence of a treatment that reduced blood vessel formation, female mice were fed a normal diet compared to others fed a high fat diet for 15 weeks, given the anti-VEGF antibody for mice (B20 4.1.1) for the first 10 days, and challenged with estrogen 6 hours prior to sampling. The uterus of each mouse was examined and frozen under liquid nitrogen. It was already noticed the whole mouse and uterine weights of anti-VEGF antibody for mice (B20 4.1.1) treated mice were lower than their untreated controls, whether high or low fat. Some uteri appeared necrotic.

Using these uterus samples, I looked for development of the c-MYC gene to find the effect of obesity versus anti-VEGF antibody for mice (B20 4.1.1). Mice were analyzed by a gene kit using a real-time PCR machine. A kit was used to examine m-RNA sequences indicating c-MYC expression. Their development was seen by fluorescence labeling of the new gene transcripts. It already appeared that the treatment had profound effects, especially on non-obese animals and that pretreatment for cancer was unwarranted. However, development of this gene assay may have proven to be a good marker for developing reproductive cancer in women.

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Apr 9th, 10:00 AM Apr 9th, 11:30 AM

A Possible Screening for the Development of Uterine Cancer in Obesity

CSU Ballroom

Constant growth and shedding of the uterine lining in women has made them prone to mutations and cancer, especially in obesity. Obese women and animals have also shown increased sensitivity of estrogen receptors. To test the hypothesis that obese female mice challenged with estrogen would have increased cancer gene expression and reduced risk in the presence of a treatment that reduced blood vessel formation, female mice were fed a normal diet compared to others fed a high fat diet for 15 weeks, given the anti-VEGF antibody for mice (B20 4.1.1) for the first 10 days, and challenged with estrogen 6 hours prior to sampling. The uterus of each mouse was examined and frozen under liquid nitrogen. It was already noticed the whole mouse and uterine weights of anti-VEGF antibody for mice (B20 4.1.1) treated mice were lower than their untreated controls, whether high or low fat. Some uteri appeared necrotic.

Using these uterus samples, I looked for development of the c-MYC gene to find the effect of obesity versus anti-VEGF antibody for mice (B20 4.1.1). Mice were analyzed by a gene kit using a real-time PCR machine. A kit was used to examine m-RNA sequences indicating c-MYC expression. Their development was seen by fluorescence labeling of the new gene transcripts. It already appeared that the treatment had profound effects, especially on non-obese animals and that pretreatment for cancer was unwarranted. However, development of this gene assay may have proven to be a good marker for developing reproductive cancer in women.

Recommended Citation

Lamoreux, Jennifer. "A Possible Screening for the Development of Uterine Cancer in Obesity." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 9, 2012.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2012/poster-session-A/7