Event Title

An Analysis of Albedo and Absorption of Solar Radiation in Regards to the Urban Heat Island Effect, Vegetation, and Potential Energy Use

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

9-4-2012 1:00 PM

End Date

9-4-2012 2:30 PM

Student's Major

Geography, Biological Sciences

Student's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mentor's Name

Willaim Mekell

Mentor's Department

Geography

Mentor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Second Mentor's Name

Forrest Wilkerson

Second Mentor's Department

Geography

Second Mentor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Description

Texas’ heat wave during the summer broke many all-time highs, including 70 plus days of temperatures above 100 degrees. Most of the problems that occurred were exacerbated by the urban heat island effect and the decline of vegetation. An Urban Heat Island has many different aspects which include trapped long wave radiation, the albedo of the surface features (darker surfaces absorb more energy), and evapotranspiration of vegetation. Research has been conducted on the Urban Heat Island effect as early as 1833 (Howard, 1833). Due to these pressing issues we have decided to research cost effective solutions to the urban heat island effect. We chose the city of Dallas as our project site because it resembles many cities in the United States and around the world; given the population size and diversity. Using geographic information science (GIS) and remote sensing, we will give reasons to modify roof/surface color and increase vegetation to reduce overall temperature and increase reflectivity. Our goal is to give a solution that is cost effective, improve overall health, and helps the environment. The final results will be presented at the Symposium.

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM Apr 9th, 2:30 PM

An Analysis of Albedo and Absorption of Solar Radiation in Regards to the Urban Heat Island Effect, Vegetation, and Potential Energy Use

CSU Ballroom

Texas’ heat wave during the summer broke many all-time highs, including 70 plus days of temperatures above 100 degrees. Most of the problems that occurred were exacerbated by the urban heat island effect and the decline of vegetation. An Urban Heat Island has many different aspects which include trapped long wave radiation, the albedo of the surface features (darker surfaces absorb more energy), and evapotranspiration of vegetation. Research has been conducted on the Urban Heat Island effect as early as 1833 (Howard, 1833). Due to these pressing issues we have decided to research cost effective solutions to the urban heat island effect. We chose the city of Dallas as our project site because it resembles many cities in the United States and around the world; given the population size and diversity. Using geographic information science (GIS) and remote sensing, we will give reasons to modify roof/surface color and increase vegetation to reduce overall temperature and increase reflectivity. Our goal is to give a solution that is cost effective, improve overall health, and helps the environment. The final results will be presented at the Symposium.

Recommended Citation

Couvertier, Elixus; Andrew Meyer; and Lisa Edman. "An Analysis of Albedo and Absorption of Solar Radiation in Regards to the Urban Heat Island Effect, Vegetation, and Potential Energy Use." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 9, 2012.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2012/poster-session-B/14