Event Title

Effect of Dynamic Warm Up After An Acute Bout of Static Stretching on Knee Flexion Isokinetic Torque Production

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

9-4-2012 1:00 PM

End Date

9-4-2012 2:30 PM

Student's Major

Human Performance

Student's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Mentor's Name

Robert Pettitt

Mentor's Department

Human Performance

Mentor's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Description

Static stretching prior to physical activity purportedly increases muscle compliance decreases elasticity resulting in reduced power performance. Prior investigators have used a change optimum angle of torque production (ϴopt) as a surrogate measure for change in muscle compliance. The purpose of this study was to peak torque and ϴopt of the hamstrings (i.e., knee flexion) in response to static and dynamic stretching. Subsequent to a familiarization trial, 14 collegiate football players performed a 5 minute, cycle ergometer warm up and a pretesting isokinetic bout of each knee at 60 deg/s for a total of 5 repetitions. In counterbalanced order, subjects performed either a static or dynamic stretching protocol (4 X 30 seconds). After a 3 minute rest, the subjects completed a posttesting isokinetic bout. Data (every 10 msec) were exported to tab-delimited text files and evaluated manually to determine peak torque and ϴopt. No differences in peak torque from pretesting (147 ± 28 Nm) to posttesting (151 ± 24 Nm) were observed between dynamic and static stretching (F=3.07, p=0.90). Similarly, no differences in ϴopt (~34 to 36°) were observed between dynamic and static stretching (F=0.23, p=0.88). Similar typical errors between repetitions, at pretesting and posttesting, were observed (~5 to 9°, 17 to 27%). Our results demonstrate that static stretching does not alter peak torque production. Moreover, the similarity of the ϴopt data refutes the hypothesis that static stretching adversely affects muscle compliance and elasticity, a result that is contrary to the dogma that static stretching reduces power.

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM Apr 9th, 2:30 PM

Effect of Dynamic Warm Up After An Acute Bout of Static Stretching on Knee Flexion Isokinetic Torque Production

CSU Ballroom

Static stretching prior to physical activity purportedly increases muscle compliance decreases elasticity resulting in reduced power performance. Prior investigators have used a change optimum angle of torque production (ϴopt) as a surrogate measure for change in muscle compliance. The purpose of this study was to peak torque and ϴopt of the hamstrings (i.e., knee flexion) in response to static and dynamic stretching. Subsequent to a familiarization trial, 14 collegiate football players performed a 5 minute, cycle ergometer warm up and a pretesting isokinetic bout of each knee at 60 deg/s for a total of 5 repetitions. In counterbalanced order, subjects performed either a static or dynamic stretching protocol (4 X 30 seconds). After a 3 minute rest, the subjects completed a posttesting isokinetic bout. Data (every 10 msec) were exported to tab-delimited text files and evaluated manually to determine peak torque and ϴopt. No differences in peak torque from pretesting (147 ± 28 Nm) to posttesting (151 ± 24 Nm) were observed between dynamic and static stretching (F=3.07, p=0.90). Similarly, no differences in ϴopt (~34 to 36°) were observed between dynamic and static stretching (F=0.23, p=0.88). Similar typical errors between repetitions, at pretesting and posttesting, were observed (~5 to 9°, 17 to 27%). Our results demonstrate that static stretching does not alter peak torque production. Moreover, the similarity of the ϴopt data refutes the hypothesis that static stretching adversely affects muscle compliance and elasticity, a result that is contrary to the dogma that static stretching reduces power.

Recommended Citation

Martens, Zachary. "Effect of Dynamic Warm Up After An Acute Bout of Static Stretching on Knee Flexion Isokinetic Torque Production." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 9, 2012.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2012/poster-session-B/16