Event Title

The Effect of Simulation Experiences on Theory Course Grade in Obstetrical Nursing

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

9-4-2012 1:00 PM

End Date

9-4-2012 2:30 PM

Student's Major

School of Nursing

Student's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Mentor's Name

Angela Christian

Mentor's Department

School of Nursing

Mentor's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Description

Background: Although making an error is common to the human behavior, when these errors affect patient care, it can be detrimental. Every year in America, at least 1.5 million individuals are injured due to medication errors (John Hopkins University (JHU), 2012). The estimated cost of these errors is $3 billion dollars annually and there are as many as 7,000 people who die from medication errors, annually (JHU, 2012). One of the top reasons listed on what contributes to medication errors is: new graduate nurses (Journal of Clinical Nursing, 2007). Multiple studies have revealed that simulation may enhance the competency levels of new nurses which ultimately could reduce medication errors. This purpose of this study was to explore simulation experiences and the impact on the theory course grade of students in obstetrical nursing.

Methods: Nursing students (N=40) were randomly assigned into two groups: intervention and control group based on the clinical instructor they had previously selected. The control group was taught using conventional clinical teaching methods, while the intervention group used conventional clinical teaching adjunct with simulation experiences and interactive modules. The theory course grades of both groups were compared.

Results/Conclusions: The theory course grade of the intervention group was significantly higher than the control group. This study concurs with previous studies that revealed the effectiveness of simulation experiences on new nurses. This study supports the use of simulation as an effective teaching approach which could eventually reduce medication errors made by new graduate nurses.

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM Apr 9th, 2:30 PM

The Effect of Simulation Experiences on Theory Course Grade in Obstetrical Nursing

CSU Ballroom

Background: Although making an error is common to the human behavior, when these errors affect patient care, it can be detrimental. Every year in America, at least 1.5 million individuals are injured due to medication errors (John Hopkins University (JHU), 2012). The estimated cost of these errors is $3 billion dollars annually and there are as many as 7,000 people who die from medication errors, annually (JHU, 2012). One of the top reasons listed on what contributes to medication errors is: new graduate nurses (Journal of Clinical Nursing, 2007). Multiple studies have revealed that simulation may enhance the competency levels of new nurses which ultimately could reduce medication errors. This purpose of this study was to explore simulation experiences and the impact on the theory course grade of students in obstetrical nursing.

Methods: Nursing students (N=40) were randomly assigned into two groups: intervention and control group based on the clinical instructor they had previously selected. The control group was taught using conventional clinical teaching methods, while the intervention group used conventional clinical teaching adjunct with simulation experiences and interactive modules. The theory course grades of both groups were compared.

Results/Conclusions: The theory course grade of the intervention group was significantly higher than the control group. This study concurs with previous studies that revealed the effectiveness of simulation experiences on new nurses. This study supports the use of simulation as an effective teaching approach which could eventually reduce medication errors made by new graduate nurses.

Recommended Citation

Mengesha, Yemesrach. "The Effect of Simulation Experiences on Theory Course Grade in Obstetrical Nursing." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 9, 2012.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2012/poster-session-B/25