Event Title

Water Crisis of Sub-Saharan Africa and its Effects on Women

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

9-4-2012 1:00 PM

End Date

9-4-2012 2:30 PM

Student's Major

Government

Student's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mentor's Name

Abdalla Battah

Mentor's Department

Government

Mentor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Description

By 2030 almost half of the world's population will be living in water stressed areas and to no one’s surprise sub-Saharan Africa holds the largest number of water stressed countries compared to any other region today. This research concentrates on three types of water crisis issues of sub-Saharan Africa: polluted water, access to safe drinking water and water scarcity. Since women are natural providers for their families they will be emphasized more with an overview of how water scarcity affects women and their livelihoods. A significant finding is that sometimes it takes women the whole day to find drinkable water as they travel on feet walking miles away from their village. Although water is running short for some countries, it does not imply that water is not there. The means of obtaining it can be costly since certain tools are required like when fixing a village well. Finding a solution to accessing drinkable water could mean that women will have more time seeking other objectives such as jobs and education. Unsanitary water also poses an issue as it leads to health diseases and poor hygiene. I have found this research to be a continuous effort made in hope that others could use it to fulfill some of their studies, and even though water is scarce it is possible for people living in sub-Saharan Africa to collect drinkable water with the assistance of funds coming from humanitarian organizations. Methods of sources used were mainly academic journals, official websites of organizations familiar with woman and water scarcity, and scholarly publications from non- governmental organizations.

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM Apr 9th, 2:30 PM

Water Crisis of Sub-Saharan Africa and its Effects on Women

CSU Ballroom

By 2030 almost half of the world's population will be living in water stressed areas and to no one’s surprise sub-Saharan Africa holds the largest number of water stressed countries compared to any other region today. This research concentrates on three types of water crisis issues of sub-Saharan Africa: polluted water, access to safe drinking water and water scarcity. Since women are natural providers for their families they will be emphasized more with an overview of how water scarcity affects women and their livelihoods. A significant finding is that sometimes it takes women the whole day to find drinkable water as they travel on feet walking miles away from their village. Although water is running short for some countries, it does not imply that water is not there. The means of obtaining it can be costly since certain tools are required like when fixing a village well. Finding a solution to accessing drinkable water could mean that women will have more time seeking other objectives such as jobs and education. Unsanitary water also poses an issue as it leads to health diseases and poor hygiene. I have found this research to be a continuous effort made in hope that others could use it to fulfill some of their studies, and even though water is scarce it is possible for people living in sub-Saharan Africa to collect drinkable water with the assistance of funds coming from humanitarian organizations. Methods of sources used were mainly academic journals, official websites of organizations familiar with woman and water scarcity, and scholarly publications from non- governmental organizations.

Recommended Citation

Xiong, Mellisa. "Water Crisis of Sub-Saharan Africa and its Effects on Women." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 9, 2012.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2012/poster-session-B/33