Event Title

Physical Activity Patterns of Deaf Adults

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

9-4-2012 1:00 PM

End Date

9-4-2012 2:30 PM

Student's Major

Human Performance

Student's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Mentor's Name

Suzannah Armentrout

Mentor's Department

Human Performance

Mentor's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Description

According to Gallaudet researchers (2012), approximately 9-22 out of 1,000 people in the United States are deaf or have severe hearing impairment. Being deaf or having a hearing impairment may influence ones’ ability to participate in physical activity and even more so if one is interested in team sports due to additional communication barriers (Hopper, 2012). Much of the research examining physical activity patterns and barriers in deaf individuals has focused on youth. For instance Longmuir and Bar-Or’s (2000) study examined physical activity participation of youth with a number of disabilities, including deaf children and found that children with hearing loss had the highest levels of physical activity participation compared to other disabilities. However most research investigating physical activity patterns of deaf youth has focused on physical education and sport programs within schools (Hopper, 2012). Physical activity patterns of deaf adults or those who have severe hearing impairment has received little attention (Hopper, 2012). In fact, Hopper has suggested that research focusing on physical activity, barriers to participation, exercise patterns, participation in team sports, and active living is “non-existent” (p. 1) in deaf adults. The purpose of this research is to provide a literature review on this topic which will be the foundation for a study in the near future. This research will address the gap in knowledge on deaf adults and individuals with severe hearing impairment discussed by Hopper. The research question is, what are the physical activity patterns of people who are deaf or have severe hearing impairment?

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM Apr 9th, 2:30 PM

Physical Activity Patterns of Deaf Adults

CSU Ballroom

According to Gallaudet researchers (2012), approximately 9-22 out of 1,000 people in the United States are deaf or have severe hearing impairment. Being deaf or having a hearing impairment may influence ones’ ability to participate in physical activity and even more so if one is interested in team sports due to additional communication barriers (Hopper, 2012). Much of the research examining physical activity patterns and barriers in deaf individuals has focused on youth. For instance Longmuir and Bar-Or’s (2000) study examined physical activity participation of youth with a number of disabilities, including deaf children and found that children with hearing loss had the highest levels of physical activity participation compared to other disabilities. However most research investigating physical activity patterns of deaf youth has focused on physical education and sport programs within schools (Hopper, 2012). Physical activity patterns of deaf adults or those who have severe hearing impairment has received little attention (Hopper, 2012). In fact, Hopper has suggested that research focusing on physical activity, barriers to participation, exercise patterns, participation in team sports, and active living is “non-existent” (p. 1) in deaf adults. The purpose of this research is to provide a literature review on this topic which will be the foundation for a study in the near future. This research will address the gap in knowledge on deaf adults and individuals with severe hearing impairment discussed by Hopper. The research question is, what are the physical activity patterns of people who are deaf or have severe hearing impairment?

Recommended Citation

Butler, Kenisha. "Physical Activity Patterns of Deaf Adults." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 9, 2012.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2012/poster-session-B/48