Event Title

Internet Censorship in China

Location

CSU 203

Start Date

16-4-2013 9:00 AM

End Date

16-4-2013 10:00 AM

Student's Major

History

Student's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mentor's Name

Tao Peng

Mentor's Department

History

Mentor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Second Mentor's Name

Thomas Hagen

Second Mentor's Department

English

Second Mentor's College

Arts and Humanities

Description

China’s stance on Internet censorship has routinely been in the news. But judging China using Western values without a basic knowledge of Chinese culture and values fails to explain why Chinese citizens are not rebelling against Internet censorship. Interest in this research was first stimulated by enrolling in a class that taught Chinese history and culture through reading and analyzing the primary texts of Daoism and Confucianism, and then looking at Chinese artwork and poetry and history through that philosophic lens. Both Western and Chinese articles on internet censorship were also read and all of this material was used in order to attempt to find the truth among conflicting points of view. My research concluded that filial piety is still a powerful force in modern China and that the social and governmental desire for harmony explains some of China’s official attitudes toward censorship. Despite these powerful cultural characteristics, my research also revealed that the people of China rather easily circumvent the censorship. My research revealed that internet censorship in China is not as serious a problem as most Western media outlets portray it to be, and that with some understanding of Chinese history and culture, one can find a more plausible explanation for the Chinese point of view and their apparent lack of rebelliousness regarding restrictions on internet use.

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Apr 16th, 9:00 AM Apr 16th, 10:00 AM

Internet Censorship in China

CSU 203

China’s stance on Internet censorship has routinely been in the news. But judging China using Western values without a basic knowledge of Chinese culture and values fails to explain why Chinese citizens are not rebelling against Internet censorship. Interest in this research was first stimulated by enrolling in a class that taught Chinese history and culture through reading and analyzing the primary texts of Daoism and Confucianism, and then looking at Chinese artwork and poetry and history through that philosophic lens. Both Western and Chinese articles on internet censorship were also read and all of this material was used in order to attempt to find the truth among conflicting points of view. My research concluded that filial piety is still a powerful force in modern China and that the social and governmental desire for harmony explains some of China’s official attitudes toward censorship. Despite these powerful cultural characteristics, my research also revealed that the people of China rather easily circumvent the censorship. My research revealed that internet censorship in China is not as serious a problem as most Western media outlets portray it to be, and that with some understanding of Chinese history and culture, one can find a more plausible explanation for the Chinese point of view and their apparent lack of rebelliousness regarding restrictions on internet use.

Recommended Citation

Sorenson, Alexander. "Internet Censorship in China." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 16, 2013.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2013/oral-session-02/4