Event Title

The Arab-African Minority in East Africa Issues of Identity, Intergration and Assimilation

Location

CSU 201

Start Date

16-4-2013 11:10 AM

End Date

16-4-2013 12:10 PM

Student's Major

Ethnic Studies

Student's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mentor's Name

Kebba Darboe

Mentor's Department

Ethnic Studies

Mentor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Description

The Dialogue between cultures was and remains the main road for the development of human civilization. Through the reciprocal understanding and interpretation of cultures over the centuries and millennia, those cultures have been mutually enriched, and so have made up the unique mosaic of human civilization. The movement of Arabs {Omanis and Yemenis} across the globe since the Islamic era, and the development of those communities will continue to interest policymakers and scholars for decades to come. The ethnic Arabs remain potential targets of xenophobic tendencies and violence. Such incidents have occurred not only in countries with existing ethnic tensions, like Sudan. Motivation/problem statement. The Historical back ground of the migration pattern, and to appraise the impact of the religion or culture of Islam on the Afro-Arab cultures, and its contribution to the promotion of the culture of peace and tolerance .The main focus is to identify some of the current challenges facing the Arab-African People {issues of identity, social integration and Assimilation. Results/findings/products: The most significant findings to describe is to understand the dialogue between cultures which can and must be the answer to the growing danger of various manifestations of intolerance and violence today or in the first decade of the twenty-first century. Conclusion/implications: There is gap of understanding each other, much of what is written about the relationship between the Arabs and the African continent arises from the West, and usually describes the relationship along a crude paradigm of “Arabs” versus “black Africans. But there is gap of understanding each other.

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Apr 16th, 11:10 AM Apr 16th, 12:10 PM

The Arab-African Minority in East Africa Issues of Identity, Intergration and Assimilation

CSU 201

The Dialogue between cultures was and remains the main road for the development of human civilization. Through the reciprocal understanding and interpretation of cultures over the centuries and millennia, those cultures have been mutually enriched, and so have made up the unique mosaic of human civilization. The movement of Arabs {Omanis and Yemenis} across the globe since the Islamic era, and the development of those communities will continue to interest policymakers and scholars for decades to come. The ethnic Arabs remain potential targets of xenophobic tendencies and violence. Such incidents have occurred not only in countries with existing ethnic tensions, like Sudan. Motivation/problem statement. The Historical back ground of the migration pattern, and to appraise the impact of the religion or culture of Islam on the Afro-Arab cultures, and its contribution to the promotion of the culture of peace and tolerance .The main focus is to identify some of the current challenges facing the Arab-African People {issues of identity, social integration and Assimilation. Results/findings/products: The most significant findings to describe is to understand the dialogue between cultures which can and must be the answer to the growing danger of various manifestations of intolerance and violence today or in the first decade of the twenty-first century. Conclusion/implications: There is gap of understanding each other, much of what is written about the relationship between the Arabs and the African continent arises from the West, and usually describes the relationship along a crude paradigm of “Arabs” versus “black Africans. But there is gap of understanding each other.

Recommended Citation

Ahmed Bani, Ahmed. "The Arab-African Minority in East Africa Issues of Identity, Intergration and Assimilation." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 16, 2013.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2013/oral-session-06/1