Event Title

Emotional Abusers and Their Effects on Custodial Arrangements Post-Divorce

Location

CSU 202

Start Date

16-4-2013 1:15 PM

End Date

16-4-2013 2:15 PM

Student's Major

Gender and Women's Studies

Student's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mentor's Name

Shannon Miller

Mentor's Department

Gender and Women's Studies

Mentor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Description

Women often believe the misconception that once a divorce is finalized, the emotional abuse will stop. Society often does not realize or acknowledge the extreme difficulty that arises in negotiating some kind of a parenting partnership with an emotional abuser even after divorce. In this research study, I conducted semi-structured in-depth interviews with women who were in the process of navigating a custodial relationship or had negotiated a custodial relationship with their emotional abuser post- divorce. Feminist research methods were applied to explore their individual experiences, allowing for their stories to be told without restriction or feelings of being silenced. Preliminary findings suggest that participants shared several experiences; such as, continued emotional abuse post-divorce, a sense of silencing by the abuser and/or society, feeling alone in their struggles, frustration with the family court system, and finally, having to resort to different strategies to ensure their own safety. These findings have implications for understanding women’s experience after divorce, as emotional abuse may continue. This means society must acknowledge its existence within the family court system. It is credible and worthy of the effort required to find new ways in which to ensure safer co-parenting practices, as well as to establish programs that validate a victim of emotional abuse’s experience within our society.

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Apr 16th, 1:15 PM Apr 16th, 2:15 PM

Emotional Abusers and Their Effects on Custodial Arrangements Post-Divorce

CSU 202

Women often believe the misconception that once a divorce is finalized, the emotional abuse will stop. Society often does not realize or acknowledge the extreme difficulty that arises in negotiating some kind of a parenting partnership with an emotional abuser even after divorce. In this research study, I conducted semi-structured in-depth interviews with women who were in the process of navigating a custodial relationship or had negotiated a custodial relationship with their emotional abuser post- divorce. Feminist research methods were applied to explore their individual experiences, allowing for their stories to be told without restriction or feelings of being silenced. Preliminary findings suggest that participants shared several experiences; such as, continued emotional abuse post-divorce, a sense of silencing by the abuser and/or society, feeling alone in their struggles, frustration with the family court system, and finally, having to resort to different strategies to ensure their own safety. These findings have implications for understanding women’s experience after divorce, as emotional abuse may continue. This means society must acknowledge its existence within the family court system. It is credible and worthy of the effort required to find new ways in which to ensure safer co-parenting practices, as well as to establish programs that validate a victim of emotional abuse’s experience within our society.

Recommended Citation

Sampson, Heidi. "Emotional Abusers and Their Effects on Custodial Arrangements Post-Divorce." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 16, 2013.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2013/oral-session-09/2