Event Title

Smart ForTwo Hybrid Vehicle Development

Location

CSU 204

Start Date

16-4-2013 1:15 PM

End Date

16-4-2013 2:15 PM

Student's Major

Automotive and Manufacturing Engineering Technology

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Bruce Jones

Mentor's Department

Automotive and Manufacturing Engineering Technology

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

The purpose of this project was to increase the usability of a hybrid Smart ForTwo vehicle. In recent years, an electric motor was added to the front of the vehicle and made to drive the front two wheels. The original diesel engine remained driving the two rear wheels. Making the diesel engine and electric motor work together left three main usability issues. Cooling support was required for the diesel engine and electric motor so that they would maintain the proper temperatures. Next, battery pack installation limited access to the diesel engine creating maintenance issues. Finally, making the diesel engine and electric motor work together required designing a program and adding a computer into the vehicle to allow communication between them. To solve these problems, proper radiator size and structure was found by measuring engine coolant intake and output temperatures as well as flow rates. This resulted in both the electric motor and diesel engine remaining at constant temperature, therefore maintaining efficient operation. A rack was constructed to safely hold batteries in place as well as to allow access to the diesel engine. Road testing was done to prove design safety and security. This allowed the engine to be properly accessed without removing 400 pounds of batteries. Finally, adding a CompactRio computer system automated the switch between diesel power and electric power. This resulted in a vehicle that would smoothly transition between diesel and electric power while driving down the road.

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Apr 16th, 1:15 PM Apr 16th, 2:15 PM

Smart ForTwo Hybrid Vehicle Development

CSU 204

The purpose of this project was to increase the usability of a hybrid Smart ForTwo vehicle. In recent years, an electric motor was added to the front of the vehicle and made to drive the front two wheels. The original diesel engine remained driving the two rear wheels. Making the diesel engine and electric motor work together left three main usability issues. Cooling support was required for the diesel engine and electric motor so that they would maintain the proper temperatures. Next, battery pack installation limited access to the diesel engine creating maintenance issues. Finally, making the diesel engine and electric motor work together required designing a program and adding a computer into the vehicle to allow communication between them. To solve these problems, proper radiator size and structure was found by measuring engine coolant intake and output temperatures as well as flow rates. This resulted in both the electric motor and diesel engine remaining at constant temperature, therefore maintaining efficient operation. A rack was constructed to safely hold batteries in place as well as to allow access to the diesel engine. Road testing was done to prove design safety and security. This allowed the engine to be properly accessed without removing 400 pounds of batteries. Finally, adding a CompactRio computer system automated the switch between diesel power and electric power. This resulted in a vehicle that would smoothly transition between diesel and electric power while driving down the road.

Recommended Citation

Varevice, Daniel and Kyle Anderson. "Smart ForTwo Hybrid Vehicle Development." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 16, 2013.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2013/oral-session-10/1