Event Title

Examining the Verity of the Empty Niche Hypothesis Using Local Wetlands as Models

Location

CSU 238

Start Date

16-4-2013 3:25 PM

End Date

16-4-2013 4:45 PM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Bradley Cook

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Invasive species are a major concern for many ecologists, park managers, and restoration scientists. The empty niche hypothesis proposes that introduced plant species become invasive because they can exploit unused resources, or empty niches, in a community. This study looks for empty niches by using historical descriptions of local wetlands to make models based on native species and their resource use. If there are any gaps in resource use that a commonly invasive species, Phalaris arundinacea (reed canary grass), Typha angustifolia (narrow-leaf cattail) or Typha x glauca (hybrid cattail), would fit into, then that wetland will be considered to have an empty niche. Wetlands with an empty niche should have the invasive species currently present; this will be examined in field studies, along with the degree to which the invader is in the niche indicated by the model.

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Apr 16th, 3:25 PM Apr 16th, 4:45 PM

Examining the Verity of the Empty Niche Hypothesis Using Local Wetlands as Models

CSU 238

Invasive species are a major concern for many ecologists, park managers, and restoration scientists. The empty niche hypothesis proposes that introduced plant species become invasive because they can exploit unused resources, or empty niches, in a community. This study looks for empty niches by using historical descriptions of local wetlands to make models based on native species and their resource use. If there are any gaps in resource use that a commonly invasive species, Phalaris arundinacea (reed canary grass), Typha angustifolia (narrow-leaf cattail) or Typha x glauca (hybrid cattail), would fit into, then that wetland will be considered to have an empty niche. Wetlands with an empty niche should have the invasive species currently present; this will be examined in field studies, along with the degree to which the invader is in the niche indicated by the model.

Recommended Citation

Stephens, Nicholas. "Examining the Verity of the Empty Niche Hypothesis Using Local Wetlands as Models." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 16, 2013.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2013/oral-session-17/5