Event Title

Bone Microvasculature of Male Mice with Reduced Testosterone Levels

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

16-4-2013 10:00 AM

End Date

16-4-2013 12:00 PM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Michael Bentley

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Bone is a highly vascular structure that is dependent on local blood supply for its proliferation, tissue remodeling capability and hence its sustainability. Bone growth was reduced in research involving ovariectomized mice with deficient estrogen levels. This reduction is correlated with a loss of vital blood supply and further supports previously established physiological relationships between estrogen deficiency and the onset of osteoporosis. While the link between osteoporosis and estrogen has been extensively studied, less research has been conducted on the correlation between osteoporosis and testosterone suppression. Since the structure of testosterone is very similar to that of estrogen, it is also believed to play a role in maintaining vasculature tissues. As a result, it is probable that testosterone suppression influences osteoporosis. Dissolving skeletal fragments in KOH and isolating the subsequent casts of plastic (Mercox resin) infused bone microvasculature from normal type mice has allowed us to establish a standard density and configuration of these tissues. Microscopy reveals notable vascular density and branching as well as maintenance of compact bone. The structure and integrity of these tissues suggest their ability to thrive under normal conditions. By obtaining and isolating bone microvasculature in castrated male mice with testosterone deficiencies we will be able to make comparisons to normal tissue and explore the possibility of a link between testosterone and vascular maintenance. Ultimately, we hope to provide further evidence for or against the link between testosterone suppression and osteoporosis.

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Apr 16th, 10:00 AM Apr 16th, 12:00 PM

Bone Microvasculature of Male Mice with Reduced Testosterone Levels

CSU Ballroom

Bone is a highly vascular structure that is dependent on local blood supply for its proliferation, tissue remodeling capability and hence its sustainability. Bone growth was reduced in research involving ovariectomized mice with deficient estrogen levels. This reduction is correlated with a loss of vital blood supply and further supports previously established physiological relationships between estrogen deficiency and the onset of osteoporosis. While the link between osteoporosis and estrogen has been extensively studied, less research has been conducted on the correlation between osteoporosis and testosterone suppression. Since the structure of testosterone is very similar to that of estrogen, it is also believed to play a role in maintaining vasculature tissues. As a result, it is probable that testosterone suppression influences osteoporosis. Dissolving skeletal fragments in KOH and isolating the subsequent casts of plastic (Mercox resin) infused bone microvasculature from normal type mice has allowed us to establish a standard density and configuration of these tissues. Microscopy reveals notable vascular density and branching as well as maintenance of compact bone. The structure and integrity of these tissues suggest their ability to thrive under normal conditions. By obtaining and isolating bone microvasculature in castrated male mice with testosterone deficiencies we will be able to make comparisons to normal tissue and explore the possibility of a link between testosterone and vascular maintenance. Ultimately, we hope to provide further evidence for or against the link between testosterone suppression and osteoporosis.

Recommended Citation

Sonnabend, Katie and Nick Jobeun. "Bone Microvasculature of Male Mice with Reduced Testosterone Levels." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 16, 2013.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2013/poster-session-A/23