Event Title

Quantifying Hydroxyl Radical in Natural Waters: An Important Pathway for Pollutant Degradation

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

16-4-2013 10:00 AM

End Date

16-4-2013 12:00 PM

Student's Major

Chemistry and Geology

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

John Thoemke

Mentor's Department

Chemistry and Geology

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

In recent years the increased use of pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and other chemicals has become a concern for the future of natural waters. Specifically, there is growing concern over the interaction of chemicals with reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species are highly reactive short-lived molecules that include oxygen. One type, the hydroxyl radical, was the focus of this study. The presence of hydroxyl radical in natural waters has been determined but its high reactivity makes it difficult to isolate and quantify. Its role in the degradation of certain chemicals has resulted in byproducts that can be more toxic than the original compound. In natural waters, the hydroxyl radical is formed through the action of sunlight on nitrate or dissolved organic matter. In this study, the hydroxyl radical was created in controlled experiments exposing nitrate to ultraviolet light.

Terephthalic acid was used as a probe to detect the hydroxyl radical. When combined with the hydroxyl radical, the terephthalic acid forms 2-hydroxyterephthalic acid, which can be measured using high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. This was quantified using high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. The amount of 2- hydroxyterephthalic acid was directly related to the amount of hydroxyl radical. With a successful way to quantify the hydroxyl radical, it will be possible in future studies to determine, in more detail, the role of hydroxyl in the degradation of specific pharmaceuticals in natural waters.

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Apr 16th, 10:00 AM Apr 16th, 12:00 PM

Quantifying Hydroxyl Radical in Natural Waters: An Important Pathway for Pollutant Degradation

CSU Ballroom

In recent years the increased use of pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and other chemicals has become a concern for the future of natural waters. Specifically, there is growing concern over the interaction of chemicals with reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species are highly reactive short-lived molecules that include oxygen. One type, the hydroxyl radical, was the focus of this study. The presence of hydroxyl radical in natural waters has been determined but its high reactivity makes it difficult to isolate and quantify. Its role in the degradation of certain chemicals has resulted in byproducts that can be more toxic than the original compound. In natural waters, the hydroxyl radical is formed through the action of sunlight on nitrate or dissolved organic matter. In this study, the hydroxyl radical was created in controlled experiments exposing nitrate to ultraviolet light.

Terephthalic acid was used as a probe to detect the hydroxyl radical. When combined with the hydroxyl radical, the terephthalic acid forms 2-hydroxyterephthalic acid, which can be measured using high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. This was quantified using high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. The amount of 2- hydroxyterephthalic acid was directly related to the amount of hydroxyl radical. With a successful way to quantify the hydroxyl radical, it will be possible in future studies to determine, in more detail, the role of hydroxyl in the degradation of specific pharmaceuticals in natural waters.

Recommended Citation

Sellner, Andria. "Quantifying Hydroxyl Radical in Natural Waters: An Important Pathway for Pollutant Degradation." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 16, 2013.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2013/poster-session-A/29