Event Title

How Intra-Clonal Density-Mediated Competition Among Rhizomes Affects the Distribution of Ramets in Three Typha Species

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

16-4-2013 10:00 AM

End Date

16-4-2013 12:00 PM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Bradley Cook

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Wetlands are an important ecosystem in southern Minnesota. Cattails (Typha spp.) are a common wetland species, and two of the three taxa found here are considered invasive. To better understand how these species become invasive, we sought to understand the architecture of clonal growth. Cattails reproduce clonally via rhizomes. We hypothesized that as a mechanism to reduce intra- clonal competition for resources, rhizomes would grow away from the parent plant 180° from each other. Sending clones in opposite directions of one another maximizes the space between them, reducing the degree of competition for resources. We collected 20 samples of each species (T. latifolia, T. angustifolia, T. x glauca) individually potted them in 40/70 grit silica sand, and placed them in a grid in a greenhouse. Samples were randomized weekly, fertilized bi-monthly, watered every other day, and treated with algaecide as needed. Samples were grown for 22 weeks and then harvested. We measured the angles of the rhizomes, plant height, leaf number, and biomass. We will perform an ANOVA to determine any statistical significance. Preliminary observations appear to agree with our hypothesis. Plants that successfully grew clones appear to have done so at near180° from each other. In the coming weeks we will harvest and analyze our data. Our findings will help to better understand the architecture that individual plants utilize when dispersing across the landscape. When making efforts to combat invasiveness, understanding the mechanisms with which species invade is crucial.

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Apr 16th, 10:00 AM Apr 16th, 12:00 PM

How Intra-Clonal Density-Mediated Competition Among Rhizomes Affects the Distribution of Ramets in Three Typha Species

CSU Ballroom

Wetlands are an important ecosystem in southern Minnesota. Cattails (Typha spp.) are a common wetland species, and two of the three taxa found here are considered invasive. To better understand how these species become invasive, we sought to understand the architecture of clonal growth. Cattails reproduce clonally via rhizomes. We hypothesized that as a mechanism to reduce intra- clonal competition for resources, rhizomes would grow away from the parent plant 180° from each other. Sending clones in opposite directions of one another maximizes the space between them, reducing the degree of competition for resources. We collected 20 samples of each species (T. latifolia, T. angustifolia, T. x glauca) individually potted them in 40/70 grit silica sand, and placed them in a grid in a greenhouse. Samples were randomized weekly, fertilized bi-monthly, watered every other day, and treated with algaecide as needed. Samples were grown for 22 weeks and then harvested. We measured the angles of the rhizomes, plant height, leaf number, and biomass. We will perform an ANOVA to determine any statistical significance. Preliminary observations appear to agree with our hypothesis. Plants that successfully grew clones appear to have done so at near180° from each other. In the coming weeks we will harvest and analyze our data. Our findings will help to better understand the architecture that individual plants utilize when dispersing across the landscape. When making efforts to combat invasiveness, understanding the mechanisms with which species invade is crucial.

Recommended Citation

Bottoms, Joseph and Breeanna Bateman. "How Intra-Clonal Density-Mediated Competition Among Rhizomes Affects the Distribution of Ramets in Three Typha Species." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 16, 2013.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2013/poster-session-A/8