Event Title

The Effects of Expanded Natural Gas Resources in Youngstown Ohio: The Potential Benefits Vs. the Potential Harm

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

16-4-2013 2:00 PM

End Date

16-4-2013 4:00 PM

Student's Major

Geography

Student's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mentor's Name

Martin Mitchell

Mentor's Department

Geography

Mentor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Description

Youngstown, Ohio is a distressed community formerly bustling with one of the largest steel manufacturing presences in U.S. history. A state of economic despair had fallen on Youngstown with the collapse of the major steel industries along with a weakening automotive industry. With Youngstown’s proximity over the Marcellus and Utica shale formations, the area has been overwhelmed by companies drilling for natural gas using such methods as hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking”, to release trapped gas otherwise inaccessible in the formations. Through field study, sides of the argument were viewed while gathering opinions from professionals, landowners and community members who have studied the issue or been directly affected by it. The study examined the many claims of environmental degradation and pinned them against the positive claims to identify the issues and assist in considering whether or not the US should continue allowing this method. It was observed that there have been direct and indirect adverse environmental effects due to fracking in Youngstown including induced earthquakes, strain on water resources and health risks from silica sand mining in other states that supply this resource for the process. There have also been several positives to fracking as it has created jobs and works toward an end to foreign dependence on natural gas resources. Results revealed a need for improvements to technologies in fracking implementation and greater restrictions placed on company’s practices but still considered that leaving the resource untouched could allow dependence shifts that would be detrimental for the U.S.

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Apr 16th, 2:00 PM Apr 16th, 4:00 PM

The Effects of Expanded Natural Gas Resources in Youngstown Ohio: The Potential Benefits Vs. the Potential Harm

CSU Ballroom

Youngstown, Ohio is a distressed community formerly bustling with one of the largest steel manufacturing presences in U.S. history. A state of economic despair had fallen on Youngstown with the collapse of the major steel industries along with a weakening automotive industry. With Youngstown’s proximity over the Marcellus and Utica shale formations, the area has been overwhelmed by companies drilling for natural gas using such methods as hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking”, to release trapped gas otherwise inaccessible in the formations. Through field study, sides of the argument were viewed while gathering opinions from professionals, landowners and community members who have studied the issue or been directly affected by it. The study examined the many claims of environmental degradation and pinned them against the positive claims to identify the issues and assist in considering whether or not the US should continue allowing this method. It was observed that there have been direct and indirect adverse environmental effects due to fracking in Youngstown including induced earthquakes, strain on water resources and health risks from silica sand mining in other states that supply this resource for the process. There have also been several positives to fracking as it has created jobs and works toward an end to foreign dependence on natural gas resources. Results revealed a need for improvements to technologies in fracking implementation and greater restrictions placed on company’s practices but still considered that leaving the resource untouched could allow dependence shifts that would be detrimental for the U.S.

Recommended Citation

Lassonde, Matthew. "The Effects of Expanded Natural Gas Resources in Youngstown Ohio: The Potential Benefits Vs. the Potential Harm." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 16, 2013.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2013/poster-session-B/42