Event Title

Determination of Protein Interactions in the Formation of Tubular Structures Using the Model Organism C. Elegans

Location

CSU 201

Start Date

21-4-2014 11:05 AM

End Date

21-4-2014 12:05 PM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Kelly Grussendorf

Mentor's Email Address

kelly.grussendorf@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Tubular structures in animals are incredibly diverse and important. The human body is full of tubular structures, for example, the digestive system, the urinary system, and the vascular (blood supply) system. In a cancerous environment, tumors require an ample supply of oxygen, and they get this oxygen by forming new blood vessels through a process known as angiogenesis. Preventing tumor angiogenesis has been the focus of numerous studies, but to do this we first need to know how tubular structures are formed. If the blood supply to the tumor is cut off, then the tumor cannot grow and eventually it will die. The roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans is an ideal organism to study tubular structure and formation. The excretory canals of the roundworm are composed of a single cell that forms an “H” shaped tubule that runs the length of the organism. Additionally, the roundworm is transparent, which makes observation of the tubular structure relatively easy. The formation and regulation of this tubular structure has been studied extensively and a number of proteins have been found to be important for tubular formation. Three of these identified proteins are known to play a role in tubular formation and maintenance, but it is not known whether or not these proteins interact with one another. The goal of this project is to determine if these three specific proteins of interest directly interact with one another. Determining this is an essential step in learning more about how tubular structures are formed.

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Apr 21st, 11:05 AM Apr 21st, 12:05 PM

Determination of Protein Interactions in the Formation of Tubular Structures Using the Model Organism C. Elegans

CSU 201

Tubular structures in animals are incredibly diverse and important. The human body is full of tubular structures, for example, the digestive system, the urinary system, and the vascular (blood supply) system. In a cancerous environment, tumors require an ample supply of oxygen, and they get this oxygen by forming new blood vessels through a process known as angiogenesis. Preventing tumor angiogenesis has been the focus of numerous studies, but to do this we first need to know how tubular structures are formed. If the blood supply to the tumor is cut off, then the tumor cannot grow and eventually it will die. The roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans is an ideal organism to study tubular structure and formation. The excretory canals of the roundworm are composed of a single cell that forms an “H” shaped tubule that runs the length of the organism. Additionally, the roundworm is transparent, which makes observation of the tubular structure relatively easy. The formation and regulation of this tubular structure has been studied extensively and a number of proteins have been found to be important for tubular formation. Three of these identified proteins are known to play a role in tubular formation and maintenance, but it is not known whether or not these proteins interact with one another. The goal of this project is to determine if these three specific proteins of interest directly interact with one another. Determining this is an essential step in learning more about how tubular structures are formed.

Recommended Citation

Chopp, Laura. "Determination of Protein Interactions in the Formation of Tubular Structures Using the Model Organism C. Elegans." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 21, 2014.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2014/oral_session_04/1