Event Title

An Investigation into the Level of Knowledge and Attitude Toward Science in an American College Population

Location

CSU 253

Start Date

21-4-2014 11:05 AM

End Date

21-4-2014 12:05 PM

Student's Major

Psychology

Student's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mentor's Name

Dawn Albertson

Mentor's Email Address

dawn.albertson@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Psychology

Mentor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Description

Science and technology are advancing faster today than ever before, creating new jobs for those willing to pursue careers in these fields. Unfortunately, many people view math and science degrees as too difficult (Many Americans Say, 2013). Federal and state agencies have been putting greater emphasis on the importance of STEM education in elementary and high schools (Mervis, 2013). The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of knowledge and attitudes toward science in an American college population compared to a sample from the UK. Data was collected using an extensive, computer-assisted interview that includes questions about interest and involvement in science, general knowledge of science, and attitudes toward science and new technology. Results will be compared to data from the Wellcome Trust Monitor to evaluate where our sample stands. Currently, the UK ranks higher than the U.S. in both science and math (Shephard, 2010) therefore, in comparison to the UK population, we expect American college students to differ significantly in science knowledge and interest in science. If there are significant discrepancies in knowledge and attitude base, identifying variables that correlate will be helpful in suggesting avenues to better target and improve the efficacy of these STEM based initiatives for the future.

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Apr 21st, 11:05 AM Apr 21st, 12:05 PM

An Investigation into the Level of Knowledge and Attitude Toward Science in an American College Population

CSU 253

Science and technology are advancing faster today than ever before, creating new jobs for those willing to pursue careers in these fields. Unfortunately, many people view math and science degrees as too difficult (Many Americans Say, 2013). Federal and state agencies have been putting greater emphasis on the importance of STEM education in elementary and high schools (Mervis, 2013). The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of knowledge and attitudes toward science in an American college population compared to a sample from the UK. Data was collected using an extensive, computer-assisted interview that includes questions about interest and involvement in science, general knowledge of science, and attitudes toward science and new technology. Results will be compared to data from the Wellcome Trust Monitor to evaluate where our sample stands. Currently, the UK ranks higher than the U.S. in both science and math (Shephard, 2010) therefore, in comparison to the UK population, we expect American college students to differ significantly in science knowledge and interest in science. If there are significant discrepancies in knowledge and attitude base, identifying variables that correlate will be helpful in suggesting avenues to better target and improve the efficacy of these STEM based initiatives for the future.

Recommended Citation

Shaw, Emilee. "An Investigation into the Level of Knowledge and Attitude Toward Science in an American College Population." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 21, 2014.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2014/oral_session_06/3