Event Title

Arc-Flash Study of a Manufacturing Facility in Northern Minnesota

Location

CSU 203

Start Date

21-4-2014 2:10 PM

End Date

21-4-2014 3:10 PM

Student's Major

Integrated Engineering

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Mohammad Habibi

Mentor's Department

Integrated Engineering

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

An arc-flash occurs as a result of a rapid release of energy due to an arcing fault. An arching fault happens when there is low impedance between a phase bus bar and another phase bus bar, or a ground. During an arcing fault, the air is a conductor which could cause substantial damage, fire, injury or even depth. Arc faults are generally limited to systems where the bus voltage is in excess of 120 volts. In order to detect potential arc-flash hazards in a manufacturing facility, a complete power analysis is required. A team of Iron Range Engineering students delivered an arc-flash and power system analysis based on the existing power distribution system of a 70,000 square foot facility located in Saginaw, MN. The team also performed short circuit, device evaluation, and coordination studies, in addition to providing individual arc flash labels for each operable protective device, 120/208VAC and larger. Additionally, they created a one-line drawing of the system by collecting extensive power data. Furthermore, the warning labels were provided for the buses protected by protective devices that are identified in the one-line drawing. A description of the entire project, outcomes and deliverable will be described in this presentation.

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Apr 21st, 2:10 PM Apr 21st, 3:10 PM

Arc-Flash Study of a Manufacturing Facility in Northern Minnesota

CSU 203

An arc-flash occurs as a result of a rapid release of energy due to an arcing fault. An arching fault happens when there is low impedance between a phase bus bar and another phase bus bar, or a ground. During an arcing fault, the air is a conductor which could cause substantial damage, fire, injury or even depth. Arc faults are generally limited to systems where the bus voltage is in excess of 120 volts. In order to detect potential arc-flash hazards in a manufacturing facility, a complete power analysis is required. A team of Iron Range Engineering students delivered an arc-flash and power system analysis based on the existing power distribution system of a 70,000 square foot facility located in Saginaw, MN. The team also performed short circuit, device evaluation, and coordination studies, in addition to providing individual arc flash labels for each operable protective device, 120/208VAC and larger. Additionally, they created a one-line drawing of the system by collecting extensive power data. Furthermore, the warning labels were provided for the buses protected by protective devices that are identified in the one-line drawing. A description of the entire project, outcomes and deliverable will be described in this presentation.

Recommended Citation

Schmitz, Daniel; Michael Rudi; John Burt; and Jon Fors. "Arc-Flash Study of a Manufacturing Facility in Northern Minnesota." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 21, 2014.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2014/oral_session_11/2