Event Title

Taking a Deeper Look at Biological Tubes & Structural Proteins in C.elegans

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

21-4-2014 10:00 AM

End Date

21-4-2014 11:30 AM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Kelly Grussendorf

Mentor's Email Address

kelly.grussendorf@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

The interactions that occur within epithelial tube structures, which are found in the many organs in the human body, are very complex. We are looking at a family of proteins known as ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM), which plays a role in the morphogenesis and maintaining the shape of these tubule structures. These proteins serve as an important point of interest as they uphold and maintain the architectural stability of these tubes as well as the fundamental structure of many cells. One of the proteins in this family has been shown to act as a linker between the membrane proteins and the cytoskeleton, erm-1, which helps provide structure in cells. To gain a better understanding of these proteins, we have been carrying out a variety of genetic tests of erm-1 in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. C.elegans have a large single-celled excretory canal providing a simple model to study. These tests consist of setting up selective mattings to introduce a marker protein into the canal of a worm that contains a mutation that stops production of the ERM-1 protein. These offspring are being analyzed under fluorescence for any canal abnormalities, and are being evaluated for severity. If the tubes of these worms appear to be structurally altered compared to normal worms; a second matting will be set up that will illuminate the subcellular components to study irregularities within the canal. This data will be further analyzed to determine the role that erm-1 plays in methodological repair and maintenance of these tubule structures.

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Apr 21st, 10:00 AM Apr 21st, 11:30 AM

Taking a Deeper Look at Biological Tubes & Structural Proteins in C.elegans

CSU Ballroom

The interactions that occur within epithelial tube structures, which are found in the many organs in the human body, are very complex. We are looking at a family of proteins known as ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM), which plays a role in the morphogenesis and maintaining the shape of these tubule structures. These proteins serve as an important point of interest as they uphold and maintain the architectural stability of these tubes as well as the fundamental structure of many cells. One of the proteins in this family has been shown to act as a linker between the membrane proteins and the cytoskeleton, erm-1, which helps provide structure in cells. To gain a better understanding of these proteins, we have been carrying out a variety of genetic tests of erm-1 in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. C.elegans have a large single-celled excretory canal providing a simple model to study. These tests consist of setting up selective mattings to introduce a marker protein into the canal of a worm that contains a mutation that stops production of the ERM-1 protein. These offspring are being analyzed under fluorescence for any canal abnormalities, and are being evaluated for severity. If the tubes of these worms appear to be structurally altered compared to normal worms; a second matting will be set up that will illuminate the subcellular components to study irregularities within the canal. This data will be further analyzed to determine the role that erm-1 plays in methodological repair and maintenance of these tubule structures.

Recommended Citation

Kampmeyer, Drew. "Taking a Deeper Look at Biological Tubes & Structural Proteins in C.elegans." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 21, 2014.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2014/poster_session_A/18